Use of thermokeratoplasty for treatment of ulcerative keratitis and bullous keratopathy secondary to corneal endothelial disease in dogs: 13 cases (1994–2001)

Tammy Miller Michau Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606.

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 DVM, MS
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Brian C. Gilger Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606.

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 DVM, MS, DACVO
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Federica Maggio Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606.

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Michael G. Davidson Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606.

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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the outcome of thermokeratoplasty for treatment of ulcerative keratitis and bullous keratopathy secondary to corneal endothelial disease in dogs.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—13 dogs.

Procedures—Medical records from 1994 to 2001 for dogs evaluated because of ulcerative keratitis and bullous keratopathy and treated with thermokeratoplasty were reviewed.

Results—There were 7 spayed females, 5 castrated males, and 1 sexually intact male, ranging from 6 to 16 years of age. Ten dogs had endothelial degeneration, and 3 dogs had breed-related endothelial dystrophy. All dogs had bullous keratopathy, characterized by microbullae formation that was detected via biomicroscopy. Recurrent or nonhealing corneal ulcers were detected unilaterally in 5 dogs and bilaterally in 8 dogs. Mean ± SD duration from thermokeratoplasty until ulcerations were healed for all dogs was 2.2 ± 1.1 weeks. All dogs that underwent thermokeratoplasty for nonhealing corneal ulceration secondary to endothelial disease and corneal edema had epithelial wound healing and resolution of corneal ulceration. Mean duration of treatment (ie, topical treatment required until resolution of ulceration) was significantly less after thermokeratoplasty than duration of treatment (with multiple treatments) prior to referral.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—It may be necessary to perform thermokeratoplasty of the entire cornea to prevent recurrence of ulcerations in areas that have not been treated with thermokeratoplasty. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2003;222: 607–612)

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the outcome of thermokeratoplasty for treatment of ulcerative keratitis and bullous keratopathy secondary to corneal endothelial disease in dogs.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—13 dogs.

Procedures—Medical records from 1994 to 2001 for dogs evaluated because of ulcerative keratitis and bullous keratopathy and treated with thermokeratoplasty were reviewed.

Results—There were 7 spayed females, 5 castrated males, and 1 sexually intact male, ranging from 6 to 16 years of age. Ten dogs had endothelial degeneration, and 3 dogs had breed-related endothelial dystrophy. All dogs had bullous keratopathy, characterized by microbullae formation that was detected via biomicroscopy. Recurrent or nonhealing corneal ulcers were detected unilaterally in 5 dogs and bilaterally in 8 dogs. Mean ± SD duration from thermokeratoplasty until ulcerations were healed for all dogs was 2.2 ± 1.1 weeks. All dogs that underwent thermokeratoplasty for nonhealing corneal ulceration secondary to endothelial disease and corneal edema had epithelial wound healing and resolution of corneal ulceration. Mean duration of treatment (ie, topical treatment required until resolution of ulceration) was significantly less after thermokeratoplasty than duration of treatment (with multiple treatments) prior to referral.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—It may be necessary to perform thermokeratoplasty of the entire cornea to prevent recurrence of ulcerations in areas that have not been treated with thermokeratoplasty. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2003;222: 607–612)

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