Infusion of guaifenesin, ketamine, and medetomidine in combination with inhalation of sevoflurane versus inhalation of sevoflurane alone for anesthesia of horses

Kazuto Yamashita Department of Veterinary Surgery 1, School of Veterinary Medicine, Rakuno Gakuen University, Ebetsu, Hokkaido 069-8501, Japan.

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William W. Muir III Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

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Sae Tsubakishita Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

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Eric Abrahamsen Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

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Phillip Lerch Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

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Yasuharu Izumisawa Department of Veterinary Surgery 1, School of Veterinary Medicine, Rakuno Gakuen University, Ebetsu, Hokkaido 069-8501, Japan.

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Tadao Kotani Department of Veterinary Surgery 1, School of Veterinary Medicine, Rakuno Gakuen University, Ebetsu, Hokkaido 069-8501, Japan.

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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate effects of infusion of guaifenesin, ketamine, and medetomidine in combination with inhalation of sevoflurane versus inhalation of sevoflurane alone for anesthesia of horses.

Design—Randomized clinical trial.

Animals—40 horses.

Procedure—Horses were premedicated with xylazine and anesthetized with diazepam and ketamine. Anesthesia was maintained by infusion of guaifenesin, ketamine, and medetomidine and inhalation of sevoflurane (20 horses) or by inhalation of sevoflurane (20 horses). A surgical plane of anesthesia was maintained by controlling the inhaled concentration of sevoflurane. Sodium pentothal was administered as necessary to prevent movement in response to surgical stimulation. Hypotension was treated with dobutamine; hypoxemia and hypercarbia were treated with intermittent positive- pressure ventilation. The quality of anesthetic induction, maintenance, and recovery and the quality of the transition to inhalation anesthesia were scored.

Results—The delivered concentration of sevoflurane (ie, the vaporizer dial setting) was significantly lower and the quality of transition to inhalation anesthesia and of anesthetic maintenance were significantly better in horses that received the guaifenesin-ketamine-medetomidine infusion than in horses that did not. Five horses, all of which received sevoflurane alone, required administration of pentothal. Recovery time and quality of recovery were not significantly different between groups, but horses that received the guaifenesin-ketamine-medetomidine infusion required fewer attempts to stand.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that in horses, the combination of a guaifenesin-ketamine- medetomidine infusion and inhalation of sevoflurane resulted in better transition and maintenance phases while improving cardiovascular function and reducing the number of attempts needed to stand after the completion of anesthesia, compared with inhalation of sevoflurane. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;221:1150–1155)

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate effects of infusion of guaifenesin, ketamine, and medetomidine in combination with inhalation of sevoflurane versus inhalation of sevoflurane alone for anesthesia of horses.

Design—Randomized clinical trial.

Animals—40 horses.

Procedure—Horses were premedicated with xylazine and anesthetized with diazepam and ketamine. Anesthesia was maintained by infusion of guaifenesin, ketamine, and medetomidine and inhalation of sevoflurane (20 horses) or by inhalation of sevoflurane (20 horses). A surgical plane of anesthesia was maintained by controlling the inhaled concentration of sevoflurane. Sodium pentothal was administered as necessary to prevent movement in response to surgical stimulation. Hypotension was treated with dobutamine; hypoxemia and hypercarbia were treated with intermittent positive- pressure ventilation. The quality of anesthetic induction, maintenance, and recovery and the quality of the transition to inhalation anesthesia were scored.

Results—The delivered concentration of sevoflurane (ie, the vaporizer dial setting) was significantly lower and the quality of transition to inhalation anesthesia and of anesthetic maintenance were significantly better in horses that received the guaifenesin-ketamine-medetomidine infusion than in horses that did not. Five horses, all of which received sevoflurane alone, required administration of pentothal. Recovery time and quality of recovery were not significantly different between groups, but horses that received the guaifenesin-ketamine-medetomidine infusion required fewer attempts to stand.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that in horses, the combination of a guaifenesin-ketamine- medetomidine infusion and inhalation of sevoflurane resulted in better transition and maintenance phases while improving cardiovascular function and reducing the number of attempts needed to stand after the completion of anesthesia, compared with inhalation of sevoflurane. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;221:1150–1155)

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