Randomized controlled trial of the efficacy of cyclosporine in the treatment of atopic dermatitis in dogs

Thierry Olivry Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606.

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 DrVet, PhD, DACVD
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Jean Steffan Novartis Animal Health, CH 4002 Basel, Switzerland.

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Roland D. Fisch Novartis Animal Health, CH 4002 Basel, Switzerland.

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Pascal Prélaud 125 rue Vieille du Temple, 75003 Paris, France.

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Eric Guaguère Clinique Veterinaire Saint Bernard, 598 Ave de Dunkerque, 59160 Lomme, France.

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Jacques Fontaine 425 Avenue Bruggmann, 1180 Bruxelles, Belgium.

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Didier N. Carlotti Clinique veterinaire Helopolis, Ave de magudas, 33700 Merignac, France.

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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate efficacy of cyclosporine A, administered at either of 2 dosages, in dogs with atopic dermatitis (AD).

Design—Multicenter randomized controlled trial.

Animals—91 dogs with AD.

Procedure—Dogs were assigned to receive placebo (30 dogs), cyclosporine at a low dosage (2.5 mg/kg [1.1 mg/lb], PO, q 24 h for 6 weeks; 30 dogs), or cyclosporine at a high dosage (5.0 mg/kg [2.3 mg/lb], PO, q 24 h for 6 weeks; 31 dogs).

Results—After 6 weeks, mean percentage reductions, compared with baseline scores, in scores of lesion severity were 34, 41, and 67% for dogs treated with the placebo, cyclosporine at the low dosage, and cyclosporine at the high dosage, respectively. Similarly, mean percentage reductions in pruritus scores were 15, 31, and 45%, respectively. Percentage reductions in skin lesion and pruritus scores were significantly higher for dogs given cyclosporine at the high dosage than for dogs given the placebo. Treatment efficacy was significantly associated with whether dogs had a history of seasonal AD. Percentage reductions in skin lesion and pruritus scores were high for dogs treated with cyclosporine at the highest dosage that had a history of nonseasonal AD. Dogs in all groups with seasonal AD improved during the study period.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that oral administration of cyclosporine at a dosage of 5.0 mg/kg once daily is effective in reducing severity of pruritus and skin lesions in dogs with AD, especially those with nonseasonal disease. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;221:370–377)

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate efficacy of cyclosporine A, administered at either of 2 dosages, in dogs with atopic dermatitis (AD).

Design—Multicenter randomized controlled trial.

Animals—91 dogs with AD.

Procedure—Dogs were assigned to receive placebo (30 dogs), cyclosporine at a low dosage (2.5 mg/kg [1.1 mg/lb], PO, q 24 h for 6 weeks; 30 dogs), or cyclosporine at a high dosage (5.0 mg/kg [2.3 mg/lb], PO, q 24 h for 6 weeks; 31 dogs).

Results—After 6 weeks, mean percentage reductions, compared with baseline scores, in scores of lesion severity were 34, 41, and 67% for dogs treated with the placebo, cyclosporine at the low dosage, and cyclosporine at the high dosage, respectively. Similarly, mean percentage reductions in pruritus scores were 15, 31, and 45%, respectively. Percentage reductions in skin lesion and pruritus scores were significantly higher for dogs given cyclosporine at the high dosage than for dogs given the placebo. Treatment efficacy was significantly associated with whether dogs had a history of seasonal AD. Percentage reductions in skin lesion and pruritus scores were high for dogs treated with cyclosporine at the highest dosage that had a history of nonseasonal AD. Dogs in all groups with seasonal AD improved during the study period.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that oral administration of cyclosporine at a dosage of 5.0 mg/kg once daily is effective in reducing severity of pruritus and skin lesions in dogs with AD, especially those with nonseasonal disease. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;221:370–377)

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