Effect of topical application of fipronil in cats with flea allergic dermatitis

Linda Medleau Department of Small Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.

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Keith A. Hnilica Department of Small Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.
Present address is Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37901-1071.

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Kimberly Lower Department of Small Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.
Present address is Dermatology Clinic for Animals, 590 E San Angelo, Gilbert, AZ 85234.

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Roberto Alva Merial Ltd, 3239 Satellite Blvd, Duluth, GA 30096.

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Terry Clekis VCA St Petersburg Animal Hospital, 3295 62nd Ave N, St Petersburg, FL 33702.

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Jerry Case Case Veterinary Hospital, 111 Eisenhower Dr, Savannah, GA 31404.

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T. Reid McArthur Altamaha Animal Clinic, Rte 5 Box 18, Vidalia, GA 30474.

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Ruth Ann Barrick Merial Ltd, 3239 Satellite Blvd, Duluth, GA 30096.

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Philippe Jeannin Merial Ltd, 3239 Satellite Blvd, Duluth, GA 30096.

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Jennifer Irwin Merial Ltd, 3239 Satellite Blvd, Duluth, GA 30096.

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Abstract

Objective—To determine whether topical application of a 10% fipronil solution would control signs of flea allergic dermatitis in cats housed under natural conditions.

Design—Multicenter open clinical trial.

Animals—42 client-owned cats with flea allergic dermatitis.

Procedures—Study cats along with all other cats and dogs living in the same houses were treated with 10% fipronil solution topically on days 0, 30, and 60. Flea counts and clinical assessments were performed on study cats on days 0, 14, 30, 60, and 90.

Results—Percentage reductions in geometric mean flea counts on days 14, 30, 60, and 90, compared with day-0 geometric mean count, were 75, 73, 85, and 94%, respectively. Pruritus score was significantly improved at each examination after day 0, and pruritus was reduced or eliminated in 31 of 40 (78%) cats at the final examination. Similarly, scores for severity of miliary dermatitis and alopecia were significantly improved at each examination, except for alopecia score on day 14. Overall treatment efficacy, assessed on day 90, was excellent for 28 (70%) cats, good for 6 (15%), moderate for 3 (7.5%), and poor for 3 (7.5%).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that monthly topical application of fipronil is effective for treatment of flea allergic dermatitis in cats housed under natural conditions. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;221:254–257)

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether topical application of a 10% fipronil solution would control signs of flea allergic dermatitis in cats housed under natural conditions.

Design—Multicenter open clinical trial.

Animals—42 client-owned cats with flea allergic dermatitis.

Procedures—Study cats along with all other cats and dogs living in the same houses were treated with 10% fipronil solution topically on days 0, 30, and 60. Flea counts and clinical assessments were performed on study cats on days 0, 14, 30, 60, and 90.

Results—Percentage reductions in geometric mean flea counts on days 14, 30, 60, and 90, compared with day-0 geometric mean count, were 75, 73, 85, and 94%, respectively. Pruritus score was significantly improved at each examination after day 0, and pruritus was reduced or eliminated in 31 of 40 (78%) cats at the final examination. Similarly, scores for severity of miliary dermatitis and alopecia were significantly improved at each examination, except for alopecia score on day 14. Overall treatment efficacy, assessed on day 90, was excellent for 28 (70%) cats, good for 6 (15%), moderate for 3 (7.5%), and poor for 3 (7.5%).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that monthly topical application of fipronil is effective for treatment of flea allergic dermatitis in cats housed under natural conditions. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;221:254–257)

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