Effects of preoperative administration of ketoprofen on whole blood platelet aggregation, buccal mucosal bleeding time, and hematologic indices in dogs undergoing elective ovariohysterectomy

Kip A. Lemke Department of Companion Animals, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3.

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 DVM, MS, DACVA
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Caroline L. Runyon Department of Companion Animals, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3.

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Barbara S. Horney Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3.

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 DVM, PhD, DACVP

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Abstract

Objective—To determine effects of preoperative administration of ketoprofen on whole blood platelet aggregation, buccal mucosal bleeding time, and hematologic indices in dogs after elective ovariohysterectomy.

Design—Randomized, masked clinical trial.

Animals—22 healthy dogs.

Procedure—60 minutes before induction of anesthesia, 11 dogs were given 0.9% NaCl solution (control), and 11 dogs were given ketoprofen (2 mg/kg [0.9 mg/lb], IM). Thirty minutes before induction of anesthesia, glycopyrrolate (0.01 mg/kg [0.005 mg/lb]), acepromazine (0.05 mg/kg [0.02 mg/lb]), and butorphanol (0.2 mg/kg [0.09 mg/lb]) were given IM to all dogs. Anesthesia was induced with thiopental (5 to 10 mg/kg [2.3 to 4.5 mg/lb], IV) and maintained with isoflurane (1 to 3%). Ovariohysterectomy was performed and butorphanol (0.1 mg/kg [0.05 mg/lb], IV) was given 15 minutes before completion of surgery. Blood samples for measurement of variables were collected at intervals before and after surgery.

Results—In dogs given ketoprofen, platelet aggregation was decreased 95 ± 10% and 80 ± 35% (mean ± SD) immediately after surgery and 24 hours after surgery, respectively, compared with preoperative values. At both times, mean values in dogs given ketoprofen differed significantly from those in control dogs. Significant differences between groups were not observed for mucosal bleeding time or hematologic indices.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Preoperative administration of ketoprofen inhibited platelet aggregation but did not alter bleeding time. Ketoprofen can be given before surgery to healthy dogs undergoing elective ovariohysterectomy, provided that dogs are screened for potential bleeding problems before surgery and monitored closely after surgery. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;220:1818–1822)

Abstract

Objective—To determine effects of preoperative administration of ketoprofen on whole blood platelet aggregation, buccal mucosal bleeding time, and hematologic indices in dogs after elective ovariohysterectomy.

Design—Randomized, masked clinical trial.

Animals—22 healthy dogs.

Procedure—60 minutes before induction of anesthesia, 11 dogs were given 0.9% NaCl solution (control), and 11 dogs were given ketoprofen (2 mg/kg [0.9 mg/lb], IM). Thirty minutes before induction of anesthesia, glycopyrrolate (0.01 mg/kg [0.005 mg/lb]), acepromazine (0.05 mg/kg [0.02 mg/lb]), and butorphanol (0.2 mg/kg [0.09 mg/lb]) were given IM to all dogs. Anesthesia was induced with thiopental (5 to 10 mg/kg [2.3 to 4.5 mg/lb], IV) and maintained with isoflurane (1 to 3%). Ovariohysterectomy was performed and butorphanol (0.1 mg/kg [0.05 mg/lb], IV) was given 15 minutes before completion of surgery. Blood samples for measurement of variables were collected at intervals before and after surgery.

Results—In dogs given ketoprofen, platelet aggregation was decreased 95 ± 10% and 80 ± 35% (mean ± SD) immediately after surgery and 24 hours after surgery, respectively, compared with preoperative values. At both times, mean values in dogs given ketoprofen differed significantly from those in control dogs. Significant differences between groups were not observed for mucosal bleeding time or hematologic indices.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Preoperative administration of ketoprofen inhibited platelet aggregation but did not alter bleeding time. Ketoprofen can be given before surgery to healthy dogs undergoing elective ovariohysterectomy, provided that dogs are screened for potential bleeding problems before surgery and monitored closely after surgery. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;220:1818–1822)

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