Intradermal testing in healthy horses and horses with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, recurrent urticaria, or allergic dermatitis

Eduard Jose-Cunilleras Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

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 DVM, DACVIM
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Catherine W. Kohn Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

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 VMD, DACVIM
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Andrew Hillier Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

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 BVSc, DACVD
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William J. A. Saville Department of Veterinary Preventive Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

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 DVM, PhD, DACVIM
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Gwendolen Lorch Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

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 DVM, MS, DACVD

Abstract

Objective—To compare responses to a variety of intradermally injected allergens among healthy horses and horses with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), recurrent urticaria (RU), and atopic dermatitis-insect hypersensitivity (allergic dermatitis [AD]).

Design—Case-control study.

Animals—86 horses.

Procedure—Results of intradermal testing for horses with COPD, RU, or AD were compared with results for healthy horses.

Results—Compared with healthy horses, horses with COPD, RU, and AD were significantly more likely to have positive (≥ 3+) reactions to intradermal allergens (molds, weeds, trees, grasses-crops, and insects) 30 minutes (immediate reaction), 4 hours (late-phase reactions), and 24 hours (delayed-phase reactions) after exposure. In addition, diseased horses reacted to a significantly higher number of allergens in each allergen group than did healthy horses.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Reactions to individual allergens should not be used to determine that horses have hypersensitivity. Overall patterns of reactivity to intradermal allergens may be helpful in management when used in conjunction with a compatible history and evidence of potential exposure to allergens in horses with conditions associated with hypersensitivity to environmental allergens. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;62:1115–1121)

Abstract

Objective—To compare responses to a variety of intradermally injected allergens among healthy horses and horses with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), recurrent urticaria (RU), and atopic dermatitis-insect hypersensitivity (allergic dermatitis [AD]).

Design—Case-control study.

Animals—86 horses.

Procedure—Results of intradermal testing for horses with COPD, RU, or AD were compared with results for healthy horses.

Results—Compared with healthy horses, horses with COPD, RU, and AD were significantly more likely to have positive (≥ 3+) reactions to intradermal allergens (molds, weeds, trees, grasses-crops, and insects) 30 minutes (immediate reaction), 4 hours (late-phase reactions), and 24 hours (delayed-phase reactions) after exposure. In addition, diseased horses reacted to a significantly higher number of allergens in each allergen group than did healthy horses.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Reactions to individual allergens should not be used to determine that horses have hypersensitivity. Overall patterns of reactivity to intradermal allergens may be helpful in management when used in conjunction with a compatible history and evidence of potential exposure to allergens in horses with conditions associated with hypersensitivity to environmental allergens. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;62:1115–1121)

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