Seroprevalence of antibodies against equine arteritis virus in horses residing in the United States and imported horses

Pamela J. Hullinger California Department of Food and Agriculture, Animal Health and Food Safety Services, Animal Health Branch, 1220 N St, Sacramento, CA 95814.

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 DVM
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Ian A. Gardner Department of Medicine and Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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 BVSc, MPVM, PhD
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Sharon K. Hietala California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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Gregory L. Ferraro Center for Equine Health, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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N. James MacLachlan Bernard and Gloria Salick Equine Viral Disease Laboratory, Department of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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 BVSc, PhD

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Abstract

Objective—To compare seroprevalence of antibodies against equine arteritis virus (EAV) in horses residing in the United States with that of imported horses.

Design—Serologic survey.

Sample Population—Serum samples from 364 horses on 44 equine operations in California and 226 horses imported from various countries.

Procedure—Serum samples were collected from each imported horse and from up to 20 horses on each operation. For resident horses, the number of sampled horses on each operation was determined on the basis of the number of horses on the operation. Samples were tested for antibodies against EAV by use of a serum neutralization test.

Results—1.9% of resident horses and 18.6% of imported horses were seropositive to EAV, including 16.1% of imported stallions.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicate that the EAV seroprevalence of horses residing in California is considerably lower than that of imported horses, including imported stallions. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;219:946–949)

Abstract

Objective—To compare seroprevalence of antibodies against equine arteritis virus (EAV) in horses residing in the United States with that of imported horses.

Design—Serologic survey.

Sample Population—Serum samples from 364 horses on 44 equine operations in California and 226 horses imported from various countries.

Procedure—Serum samples were collected from each imported horse and from up to 20 horses on each operation. For resident horses, the number of sampled horses on each operation was determined on the basis of the number of horses on the operation. Samples were tested for antibodies against EAV by use of a serum neutralization test.

Results—1.9% of resident horses and 18.6% of imported horses were seropositive to EAV, including 16.1% of imported stallions.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicate that the EAV seroprevalence of horses residing in California is considerably lower than that of imported horses, including imported stallions. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;219:946–949)

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