Episioplasty for the treatment of perivulvar dermatitis or recurrent urinary tract infections in dogs with excessive perivulvar skin folds: 31 cases (1983–2000)

Barbara A. Lightner Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.
present address is Capital Veterinary Referral Center, 3578 W Broad St, Columbus, OH 43228.

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Mary A. McLoughlin Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

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Dennis J. Chew Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

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Stephanie M. Beardsley Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.
Present address is Central Texas Veterinary Specialty Hospital, 4434 Frontier Trail, Austin, TX 78745.

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Hilary K. Matthews Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.
present address is Capital Veterinary Referral Center, 3578 W Broad St, Columbus, OH 43228.

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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effectiveness of episioplasty for the treatment of perivulvar dermatitis or chronic or recurrent urinary tract infections (UTI) believed to be secondary to excessive perivulvar skin folds in dogs and to document whether a causal relationship exists between the presence of chronic or recurrent UTI and excessive perivulvar skin folds in female dogs.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—31 female dogs.

Procedure—Medical records of dogs with vulvar dermatitis (group 1; n = 15) or UTI (group 2; 16) were reviewed for history, signalment, physical examination findings, hematologic findings, results of urine or vaginal bacteriologic culture, and results of additional diagnostic procedures.

Results—14 of 15 dogs in group 1 had complete resolution of perivulvar dermatitis and associated clinical signs following episioplasty. One dog had a relapse of clinical signs and vulvar dermatitis 2 years after surgery in association with a 9-kg (19.8-lb) weight gain. Sixteen of 16 dogs in group 2 had complete resolution of clinical signs of UTI following episioplasty. Urine samples were obtained via cystocentesis no earlier than 1 month after surgery to confirm resolution of UTI in 13 of 16 of dogs in group 2. Mild-to-moderate incisional swelling was the only surgical complication reported for either group, with the exception of 1 dog in group 2 that had wound dehiscence. All owners were satisfied with surgical outcomes.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—All owners reported complete resolution of clinical signs for both groups of dogs. Episioplasty is an effective low morbidity treatment for perivulvar dermatitis and chronic UTI associated with excessive perivulvar skin folds. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;219:1577–1581)

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effectiveness of episioplasty for the treatment of perivulvar dermatitis or chronic or recurrent urinary tract infections (UTI) believed to be secondary to excessive perivulvar skin folds in dogs and to document whether a causal relationship exists between the presence of chronic or recurrent UTI and excessive perivulvar skin folds in female dogs.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—31 female dogs.

Procedure—Medical records of dogs with vulvar dermatitis (group 1; n = 15) or UTI (group 2; 16) were reviewed for history, signalment, physical examination findings, hematologic findings, results of urine or vaginal bacteriologic culture, and results of additional diagnostic procedures.

Results—14 of 15 dogs in group 1 had complete resolution of perivulvar dermatitis and associated clinical signs following episioplasty. One dog had a relapse of clinical signs and vulvar dermatitis 2 years after surgery in association with a 9-kg (19.8-lb) weight gain. Sixteen of 16 dogs in group 2 had complete resolution of clinical signs of UTI following episioplasty. Urine samples were obtained via cystocentesis no earlier than 1 month after surgery to confirm resolution of UTI in 13 of 16 of dogs in group 2. Mild-to-moderate incisional swelling was the only surgical complication reported for either group, with the exception of 1 dog in group 2 that had wound dehiscence. All owners were satisfied with surgical outcomes.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—All owners reported complete resolution of clinical signs for both groups of dogs. Episioplasty is an effective low morbidity treatment for perivulvar dermatitis and chronic UTI associated with excessive perivulvar skin folds. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;219:1577–1581)

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