Steroidogenic response of adrenal tissues after administration of ACTH to dogs with hypercortisolemia

Linda A. Frank Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37901.

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 MS, DVM, DACVD
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Lynn P. Schmeitzel Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37901.

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Jack W. Oliver Department of Comparative Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37901.

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 DVM, PhD

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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate adrenal sex hormone concentrations in neutered dogs with hypercortisolemia.

Design—Case series.

Animals—11 neutered dogs with hypercortisolemia.

Procedure—Serum samples obtained before and 1 hour after administration of ACTH were evaluated for concentrations of cortisol, progesterone, testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate or androstenedione or both, and 17-hydroxyprogesterone.

Results—For all dogs, concentrations of 1 or more adrenal sex hormones were substantially greater than reference range values before or after administration of ACTH. Testosterone concentration was not greater than reference range values in any of the dogs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results emphasize the importance of ruling out hypercortisolemia before measuring adrenal sex hormone concentrations as a means of diagnosing adrenal hyperplasia syndrome (alopecia X) in dogs. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;218:214–216)

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate adrenal sex hormone concentrations in neutered dogs with hypercortisolemia.

Design—Case series.

Animals—11 neutered dogs with hypercortisolemia.

Procedure—Serum samples obtained before and 1 hour after administration of ACTH were evaluated for concentrations of cortisol, progesterone, testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate or androstenedione or both, and 17-hydroxyprogesterone.

Results—For all dogs, concentrations of 1 or more adrenal sex hormones were substantially greater than reference range values before or after administration of ACTH. Testosterone concentration was not greater than reference range values in any of the dogs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results emphasize the importance of ruling out hypercortisolemia before measuring adrenal sex hormone concentrations as a means of diagnosing adrenal hyperplasia syndrome (alopecia X) in dogs. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;218:214–216)

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