Efficacy of salmeterol xinafoate in horses with recurrent airway obstruction

Sarah L. Henrikson Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506-5606.

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Bonnie R. Rush Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506-5606.

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 DVM, MS, DACVIM

Abstract

Objective—To determine the onset, magnitude, and duration of bronchodilation after administration of aerosolized salmeterol xinafoate in horses with recurrent airway obstruction.

Design—Randomized controlled study

Animals—6 horses with recurrent airway obstruction.

Procedure—Horses received aerosolized salmeterol (210 µg) or no treatment, using a crossover design. Salmeterol was administered, using a mask designed for aerosol delivery in horses. Subjective rating of airway obstruction (RAO), maximal change in pleural pressure (ΔPplmax), and pulmonary resistance (RL) were determined at baseline; 5, 15, and 30 minutes; and 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 hours after administration of salmeterol and in horses that did not receive treatment.

Results—The ΔPpl and RL were improved 15 minutes through 6 hours after administration of salmeterol, compared with values obtained from horses receiving no treatment. The RAO was improved 15 minutes through 2 hours after administration of salmeterol. The maximal response to salmeterol was evident 30 to 60 minutes after administration and was characterized by a 59 ± 19% decrease in ΔPpl and a 56 ± 13% decrease in RL. The ΔPpl and RL were not different from baseline values 8 hours after salmeterol administration.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Duration of action of salmeterol in these horses was approximately 6 hours. Maximal bronchodilation was somewhat delayed (30 to 60 minutes), and the magnitude of response was similar to that of short-acting β2-adrenergic agonists. Salmeterol provides moderately sustained bronchodilation in horses with recurrent airway obstruction and may be an effective drug for long-term control of this condition. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;218:1961–1965).

Abstract

Objective—To determine the onset, magnitude, and duration of bronchodilation after administration of aerosolized salmeterol xinafoate in horses with recurrent airway obstruction.

Design—Randomized controlled study

Animals—6 horses with recurrent airway obstruction.

Procedure—Horses received aerosolized salmeterol (210 µg) or no treatment, using a crossover design. Salmeterol was administered, using a mask designed for aerosol delivery in horses. Subjective rating of airway obstruction (RAO), maximal change in pleural pressure (ΔPplmax), and pulmonary resistance (RL) were determined at baseline; 5, 15, and 30 minutes; and 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 hours after administration of salmeterol and in horses that did not receive treatment.

Results—The ΔPpl and RL were improved 15 minutes through 6 hours after administration of salmeterol, compared with values obtained from horses receiving no treatment. The RAO was improved 15 minutes through 2 hours after administration of salmeterol. The maximal response to salmeterol was evident 30 to 60 minutes after administration and was characterized by a 59 ± 19% decrease in ΔPpl and a 56 ± 13% decrease in RL. The ΔPpl and RL were not different from baseline values 8 hours after salmeterol administration.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Duration of action of salmeterol in these horses was approximately 6 hours. Maximal bronchodilation was somewhat delayed (30 to 60 minutes), and the magnitude of response was similar to that of short-acting β2-adrenergic agonists. Salmeterol provides moderately sustained bronchodilation in horses with recurrent airway obstruction and may be an effective drug for long-term control of this condition. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;218:1961–1965).

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