Association between measures of milk quality and risk of violative antimicrobial residues in grade-A raw milk

William J. A. Saville Department of Veterinary Preventive Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

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Thomas E. Wittum Department of Veterinary Preventive Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

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K. Larry Smith Department of Animal Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

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Abstract

Objective—To determine whether bulk-tank standard plate counts or plate loop counts and bulk-tank somatic cell counts (SCC) were associated with detection of violative antimicrobial residues in milk from dairy cattle.

Design—Longitudinal study.

Procedure—Information for 1994 through 1997 was obtained from a large milk marketing cooperative that operated in multiple states throughout the northeastern and midwestern United States (16,831 herd-years of information from 6,546 farms) and from the Ohio Department of Agriculture Grade-A Milk Certification Program (12,042 herd-years of information from 4,022 farms). Data were analyzed by use of multivariate logistic regression.

Results—For both data sets, odds that a violative antibiotic residue would be detected increased as mean SCC for the herd-year increased. Standard plate counts and plate loop counts were not associated with odds that a violative antibiotic residue would be detected.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results of this study suggested that the odds that a violative antibiotic residue would be found in bulk-tank milk increased as mean SCC for the herd-year increased. This suggests that management practices that would be expected to influence SCC may also influence the risk of antibiotic residue violations. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;217:541–545)

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether bulk-tank standard plate counts or plate loop counts and bulk-tank somatic cell counts (SCC) were associated with detection of violative antimicrobial residues in milk from dairy cattle.

Design—Longitudinal study.

Procedure—Information for 1994 through 1997 was obtained from a large milk marketing cooperative that operated in multiple states throughout the northeastern and midwestern United States (16,831 herd-years of information from 6,546 farms) and from the Ohio Department of Agriculture Grade-A Milk Certification Program (12,042 herd-years of information from 4,022 farms). Data were analyzed by use of multivariate logistic regression.

Results—For both data sets, odds that a violative antibiotic residue would be detected increased as mean SCC for the herd-year increased. Standard plate counts and plate loop counts were not associated with odds that a violative antibiotic residue would be detected.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results of this study suggested that the odds that a violative antibiotic residue would be found in bulk-tank milk increased as mean SCC for the herd-year increased. This suggests that management practices that would be expected to influence SCC may also influence the risk of antibiotic residue violations. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;217:541–545)

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