Oral vesicular lesions in horses without evidence of vesicular stomatitis virus infection

Lisa'Marie Kim Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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Paul S. Morley Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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Brian J. McCluskey USDA:Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service:Veterinary Services:Centers for Epidemiology and Animal Health, Fort Collins, CO 80524.

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Elizabeth L. Mumford Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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Sabrina L. Swenson USDA:Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service:National Veterinary Services Laboratories, Ames, IA 50010.

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M. D. Salman Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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Abstract

Objective—To report clinical and serologic findings in horses with oral vesicular lesions that were consistent with vesicular stomatitis (VS) but apparently were not associated with VS virus (VSV) infection.

Design—Serial case study.

Animals—8 horses.

Procedure—Horses were quarantined after appearance of oral lesions typical of VS. Severity of clinical signs was scored every 2 to 5 days for 3 months. Serum samples were tested for antibodies by use of competitive ELISA (cELISA), capture ELISA for IgM, serum neutralization, and complement fixation (CF). Virus isolation was attempted from swab specimens of active lesions.

Results—2 horses with oral vesicular lesions on day 1 had antibodies (cELISA and CF) against VSV; however, results of CF were negative by day 19. Five of the 6 remaining horses were seronegative but developed oral lesions by day 23. Virus isolation was unsuccessful for all horses.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Horses were quarantined for 75 days in compliance with state and federal regulations. However, evidence suggests that oral lesions were apparently not associated with VSV infection. The occurrence in livestock of a vesicular disease that is not caused by VSV could confound efforts to improve control of VS in the United States and could impact foreign trade.Vesicular stomatitis is of substantial economic and regulatory concern. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;216:1399–1404)

Abstract

Objective—To report clinical and serologic findings in horses with oral vesicular lesions that were consistent with vesicular stomatitis (VS) but apparently were not associated with VS virus (VSV) infection.

Design—Serial case study.

Animals—8 horses.

Procedure—Horses were quarantined after appearance of oral lesions typical of VS. Severity of clinical signs was scored every 2 to 5 days for 3 months. Serum samples were tested for antibodies by use of competitive ELISA (cELISA), capture ELISA for IgM, serum neutralization, and complement fixation (CF). Virus isolation was attempted from swab specimens of active lesions.

Results—2 horses with oral vesicular lesions on day 1 had antibodies (cELISA and CF) against VSV; however, results of CF were negative by day 19. Five of the 6 remaining horses were seronegative but developed oral lesions by day 23. Virus isolation was unsuccessful for all horses.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Horses were quarantined for 75 days in compliance with state and federal regulations. However, evidence suggests that oral lesions were apparently not associated with VSV infection. The occurrence in livestock of a vesicular disease that is not caused by VSV could confound efforts to improve control of VS in the United States and could impact foreign trade.Vesicular stomatitis is of substantial economic and regulatory concern. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;216:1399–1404)

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