Predictors of arterial oxygen tension in anesthetized horses: 1,610 cases (1992–1994)

Karen J. Whitehair From the Veterinary Teaching Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine (Whitehair), and the Statistical Laboratory (Willits), University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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 DVM, MS, DACVS, DACVA
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Neil H. Willits From the Veterinary Teaching Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine (Whitehair), and the Statistical Laboratory (Willits), University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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 PhD

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Objective

To identify factors associated with various arterial partial pressures of oxygen (PaO2) in anesthetized horses.

Design

Retrospective study.

Animals

1,450 horses anesthetized a total of 1,610 times with isoflurane or halothane.

Procedure

Anesthesia records, particularly results of blood gas analyses, were reviewed, and horses were grouped on the basis of lowest Pao2.

Results

For horses with lowest Pao2 < 120 mm Hg, those with low pulse pressure, that underwent anesthesia on an emergency basis, or that were males were more likely to have Pao2 < 80 mm Hg. For horses with lowest Pao22 < 250 mm Hg, those that were positioned in dorsal recumbency, that underwent anesthesia on an emergency basis, or that had a shorter duration of anesthesia were more likely to have lowest Pao2 < 120 mm Hg. For horses with lowest PaO2 < 400 mm Hg, those that were positioned in dorsal recumbency, that underwent anesthesia on an emergency basis, that had a shorter duration of anesthesia, that were older, that were heavier, or that were being ventilated mechanically were more likely to have lowest Pao2 < 250 mm Hg.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

Low pulse pressure, emergency case status, dorsal recumbency, and short duration of anesthesia were significantly related with lower Pao2 in anesthetized horses. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1999;215:978–981)

Objective

To identify factors associated with various arterial partial pressures of oxygen (PaO2) in anesthetized horses.

Design

Retrospective study.

Animals

1,450 horses anesthetized a total of 1,610 times with isoflurane or halothane.

Procedure

Anesthesia records, particularly results of blood gas analyses, were reviewed, and horses were grouped on the basis of lowest Pao2.

Results

For horses with lowest Pao2 < 120 mm Hg, those with low pulse pressure, that underwent anesthesia on an emergency basis, or that were males were more likely to have Pao2 < 80 mm Hg. For horses with lowest Pao22 < 250 mm Hg, those that were positioned in dorsal recumbency, that underwent anesthesia on an emergency basis, or that had a shorter duration of anesthesia were more likely to have lowest Pao2 < 120 mm Hg. For horses with lowest PaO2 < 400 mm Hg, those that were positioned in dorsal recumbency, that underwent anesthesia on an emergency basis, that had a shorter duration of anesthesia, that were older, that were heavier, or that were being ventilated mechanically were more likely to have lowest Pao2 < 250 mm Hg.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

Low pulse pressure, emergency case status, dorsal recumbency, and short duration of anesthesia were significantly related with lower Pao2 in anesthetized horses. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1999;215:978–981)

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