clinical signs associated with brain tumors in dogs: 97 cases (1992–1997)

Rodney S. Bagley From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-7060.

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 DVM, DACVIM
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Patrick R. Gavin From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-7060.

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 DVM, PhD, DACVR
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Michael P. Moore From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-7060.

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Gena M. Silver From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-7060.

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Michael L. Harrington From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-7060.

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Rebecca L. Connors From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-7060.

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Objective

To determine the prevalence of various clinical signs in dogs with brain tumors.

Design

Retrospective study.

Animals

97 dogs with brain tumors.

Procedure

Medical records were reviewed for signalment, tumor type and location, and clinical signs.

Results

33 breeds were represented; Golden Retrievers were most commonly affected. Most dogs were older (median age, 9 years); 95% of dogs were ≥ 5 years old. Seventy-six percent of dogs had tumors in the supratentorial region. Seizures were the most common clinical sign at initial examination, with lower prevalence for circling, ataxia, and head tilt. Meningioma was the most common tumor.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

Brain tumors develop most often in dogs ≥ 5 years old and are uncommon in dogs < 5 years old. Seizures are a common clinical sign, and a brain tumor should be considered in dogs that have their first seizure after they are 4 years old. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1999;215:818–819)

Objective

To determine the prevalence of various clinical signs in dogs with brain tumors.

Design

Retrospective study.

Animals

97 dogs with brain tumors.

Procedure

Medical records were reviewed for signalment, tumor type and location, and clinical signs.

Results

33 breeds were represented; Golden Retrievers were most commonly affected. Most dogs were older (median age, 9 years); 95% of dogs were ≥ 5 years old. Seventy-six percent of dogs had tumors in the supratentorial region. Seizures were the most common clinical sign at initial examination, with lower prevalence for circling, ataxia, and head tilt. Meningioma was the most common tumor.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

Brain tumors develop most often in dogs ≥ 5 years old and are uncommon in dogs < 5 years old. Seizures are a common clinical sign, and a brain tumor should be considered in dogs that have their first seizure after they are 4 years old. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1999;215:818–819)

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