Prevalence of Campylobacter spp isolated from the intestinal tract of pigs raised in an integrated swine production system

Roger B. Harvey From the USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Food Animal Protection Research Laboratory, 2881 F&B Rd, College Station, TX 77845.

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Colin R. Young From the USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Food Animal Protection Research Laboratory, 2881 F&B Rd, College Station, TX 77845.

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Richard L. Ziprin From the USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Food Animal Protection Research Laboratory, 2881 F&B Rd, College Station, TX 77845.

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Michael E. Hume From the USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Food Animal Protection Research Laboratory, 2881 F&B Rd, College Station, TX 77845.

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Kenneth J. Genovese From the USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Food Animal Protection Research Laboratory, 2881 F&B Rd, College Station, TX 77845.

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Robin C. Anderson From the USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Food Animal Protection Research Laboratory, 2881 F&B Rd, College Station, TX 77845.

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Robert E. Droleskey From the USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Food Animal Protection Research Laboratory, 2881 F&B Rd, College Station, TX 77845.

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Larry H. Stanker From the USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Food Animal Protection Research Laboratory, 2881 F&B Rd, College Station, TX 77845.

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David J. Nisbet From the USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Food Animal Protection Research Laboratory, 2881 F&B Rd, College Station, TX 77845.

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Objective

To enumerate the prevalence of Campylobacter isolates in the intestinal tract of market-weight swine raised in an integrated swine operation in Texas.

Sample Population

Samples of cecal contents were collected from 595 pigs (mean body weight, 110 kg [242 lb]) at time of slaughter. Pigs were offspring of Yorkshire-Landrace sows and Duroc or Hampshire boars. Pigs originated from 4 farrow-to-finish farms.

Procedure

During a 9-month period, visits were made to a slaughter plant to remove cecal contents from market-weight hogs. Samples were obtained from 50 pigs/visit from designated farms so that samples were obtained 3 times from pigs of each of 4 farms. Isolation of Campylobacter spp was accomplished by use of enrichment broth and restrictive media, using microaerophilic conditions.

Results

Campylobacter spp were isolated from 70 to 100% of the pigs, depending on the farm and the date the samples were collected. Campylobacter coli was isolated from 20 to 100% (mean, 60%) of samples, and C jejuni was isolated from 0 to 76% (mean, 31%) of samples. Campylobacter lari was isolated from 2 pigs. Concentrations of C coli or C jejuni ranged from 103 to 107 colony-forming units/g of cecal content.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

Campylobacter coli generally is accepted as a common inhabitant of the intestinal tract of swine. However, analysis of results of this study suggests that a relatively high prevalence of C jejuni may be found in pigs raised on specific farms. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1999;215:1601–1604)

Objective

To enumerate the prevalence of Campylobacter isolates in the intestinal tract of market-weight swine raised in an integrated swine operation in Texas.

Sample Population

Samples of cecal contents were collected from 595 pigs (mean body weight, 110 kg [242 lb]) at time of slaughter. Pigs were offspring of Yorkshire-Landrace sows and Duroc or Hampshire boars. Pigs originated from 4 farrow-to-finish farms.

Procedure

During a 9-month period, visits were made to a slaughter plant to remove cecal contents from market-weight hogs. Samples were obtained from 50 pigs/visit from designated farms so that samples were obtained 3 times from pigs of each of 4 farms. Isolation of Campylobacter spp was accomplished by use of enrichment broth and restrictive media, using microaerophilic conditions.

Results

Campylobacter spp were isolated from 70 to 100% of the pigs, depending on the farm and the date the samples were collected. Campylobacter coli was isolated from 20 to 100% (mean, 60%) of samples, and C jejuni was isolated from 0 to 76% (mean, 31%) of samples. Campylobacter lari was isolated from 2 pigs. Concentrations of C coli or C jejuni ranged from 103 to 107 colony-forming units/g of cecal content.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

Campylobacter coli generally is accepted as a common inhabitant of the intestinal tract of swine. However, analysis of results of this study suggests that a relatively high prevalence of C jejuni may be found in pigs raised on specific farms. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1999;215:1601–1604)

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