Calcium oxalate crystalluria in a goat

Phillip Clark From the Department of Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (Clark, Swenson), and the Minnesota Urolith Center, Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108 (Osborne, Ulrich).

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Cheryl L. Swenson From the Department of Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (Clark, Swenson), and the Minnesota Urolith Center, Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108 (Osborne, Ulrich).

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Carl A. Osborne From the Department of Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (Clark, Swenson), and the Minnesota Urolith Center, Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108 (Osborne, Ulrich).

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Lisa K. Ulrich From the Department of Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (Clark, Swenson), and the Minnesota Urolith Center, Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108 (Osborne, Ulrich).

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  • Recognition of the diverse shapes of various urine crystals is necessary for their accurate identification.

  • Calcium oxalate dihydrate crystals most commonly have an octahedral or envelope shape.

  • Calcium ions and oxalic acid may form calcium oxalate crystals in urine.

  • Calcium oxalate dihydrate crystalluria is a risk factor for urolith formation.

  • Recognition of the diverse shapes of various urine crystals is necessary for their accurate identification.

  • Calcium oxalate dihydrate crystals most commonly have an octahedral or envelope shape.

  • Calcium ions and oxalic acid may form calcium oxalate crystals in urine.

  • Calcium oxalate dihydrate crystalluria is a risk factor for urolith formation.

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