Control of fleas on pets and in homes by use of imidacloprid or lufenuron and a pyrethrin spray

Michael W. Dryden From the Department of Diagnostic Medicine and Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506-5603.

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Hector R. Perez From the Department of Diagnostic Medicine and Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506-5603.

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Daniel M. Ulitchny From the Department of Diagnostic Medicine and Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506-5603.

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Objective

To evaluate imidacloprid and the combination of lufenuron and pyrethrin to control flea infestations in households with pets.

Animals

37 dogs and 19 cats in 34 flea-infested households.

Procedure

Households were assigned randomly to 1 of 2 groups. Pets in group 1 were treated topically with imidacloprid on day 0, then once a month for 90 days. Pets in group 2 were given lufenuron orally on day O and at monthly intervals for 90 days and also were treated topically with a pyrethrin spray every 1 to 2 weeks throughout the study. Flea numbers in homes were assessed by use of intermittent light traps, and flea burdens on pets were assessed using visual area counts done once a week during the first month, then every other week.

Results

One application of imidacloprid reduced flea burdens on pets by 96 and 93.5% on days 7 and 28, respectively, compared with day-O burdens. Following 3 applications, flea burdens on pets and in homes were reduced by 98.8 and 99.9%, respectively. Lufenuron and pyrethrin spray reduced flea numbers on pets by 48.9 and 91.1% on days 7 and 28, respectively. By the end of the study, this combination reduced flea burdens on pets and in homes by 99.2 and 99.7%, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

Imidacloprid applied topically or lufenuron administered orally along with a topically applied pyrethrin spray were effective in eliminating fleas on pets and in homes. Flea control can be achieved with topical application of adulticides or oral administration of insect growth regulators without concomitant treatment of the surroundings. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1999;215:36-39)

Objective

To evaluate imidacloprid and the combination of lufenuron and pyrethrin to control flea infestations in households with pets.

Animals

37 dogs and 19 cats in 34 flea-infested households.

Procedure

Households were assigned randomly to 1 of 2 groups. Pets in group 1 were treated topically with imidacloprid on day 0, then once a month for 90 days. Pets in group 2 were given lufenuron orally on day O and at monthly intervals for 90 days and also were treated topically with a pyrethrin spray every 1 to 2 weeks throughout the study. Flea numbers in homes were assessed by use of intermittent light traps, and flea burdens on pets were assessed using visual area counts done once a week during the first month, then every other week.

Results

One application of imidacloprid reduced flea burdens on pets by 96 and 93.5% on days 7 and 28, respectively, compared with day-O burdens. Following 3 applications, flea burdens on pets and in homes were reduced by 98.8 and 99.9%, respectively. Lufenuron and pyrethrin spray reduced flea numbers on pets by 48.9 and 91.1% on days 7 and 28, respectively. By the end of the study, this combination reduced flea burdens on pets and in homes by 99.2 and 99.7%, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

Imidacloprid applied topically or lufenuron administered orally along with a topically applied pyrethrin spray were effective in eliminating fleas on pets and in homes. Flea control can be achieved with topical application of adulticides or oral administration of insect growth regulators without concomitant treatment of the surroundings. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1999;215:36-39)

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