Comparison of serum fructosamine and blood glycosylated hemoglobin concentrations for assessment of glycemic control in cats with diabetes mellitus

Denise A. Elliott From the Departments of Molecular Biosciences (Elliott) and Medicine and Epidemiology (Nelson, Feldman, Neal), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA, 95616, and the Department of Veterinary Internal Medicine (Reusch), Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Munich, 80539 Munich 22, Germany.

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Richard W. Nelson From the Departments of Molecular Biosciences (Elliott) and Medicine and Epidemiology (Nelson, Feldman, Neal), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA, 95616, and the Department of Veterinary Internal Medicine (Reusch), Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Munich, 80539 Munich 22, Germany.

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Claudia E. Reusch From the Departments of Molecular Biosciences (Elliott) and Medicine and Epidemiology (Nelson, Feldman, Neal), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA, 95616, and the Department of Veterinary Internal Medicine (Reusch), Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Munich, 80539 Munich 22, Germany.

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Edward C. Feldman From the Departments of Molecular Biosciences (Elliott) and Medicine and Epidemiology (Nelson, Feldman, Neal), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA, 95616, and the Department of Veterinary Internal Medicine (Reusch), Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Munich, 80539 Munich 22, Germany.

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Larry A. Neal From the Departments of Molecular Biosciences (Elliott) and Medicine and Epidemiology (Nelson, Feldman, Neal), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA, 95616, and the Department of Veterinary Internal Medicine (Reusch), Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Munich, 80539 Munich 22, Germany.

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Objective

To correlate serum fructosamine concentrations with established measures of glycemic control and to compare serum fructosamine and blood glycosylated hemoglobin (GHb) concentrations as a means for assessing glycemic control in diabetic cats.

Design

Longitudinal cohort study.

Animals

26 healthy cats, 5 cats with stress-induced hyperglycemia, 15 untreated diabetic cats, and 36 treated diabetic cats.

Procedure

Control of glycemia was classified and monitored and serum fructosamine and blood GHb concentrations were measured for 12 poorly controlled diabetic cats before and after improving glycemic control, 8 well-controlled treated diabetic cats before and after glycemic control deteriorated, and 5 cats with diabetes mellitus before and after onset of stress-induced hyperglycemia.

Results

Mean serum fructosamine and blood GHb concentrations were significantly higher in untreated diabetic cats, compared with healthy cats, and in 24 poorly controlled diabetic cats, compared with 12 well-controlled diabetic cats. Mean serum fructosamine and blood GHb concentrations decreased significantly in 12 poorly controlled diabetic cats after improving glycemic control and increased significantly in 8 well-controlled diabetic cats after glycemic control deteriorated. A significant stress-induced increase in mean blood glucose concentration was evident 12 hours after insulin administration, but not in 5 docile diabetic cats that became fractious.

Clinical Implications

Serum fructosamine and blood GHb concentrations are clinically useful tools for monitoring control of glycemia in cats with diabetes mellitus. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1999;214:1794-1798)

Objective

To correlate serum fructosamine concentrations with established measures of glycemic control and to compare serum fructosamine and blood glycosylated hemoglobin (GHb) concentrations as a means for assessing glycemic control in diabetic cats.

Design

Longitudinal cohort study.

Animals

26 healthy cats, 5 cats with stress-induced hyperglycemia, 15 untreated diabetic cats, and 36 treated diabetic cats.

Procedure

Control of glycemia was classified and monitored and serum fructosamine and blood GHb concentrations were measured for 12 poorly controlled diabetic cats before and after improving glycemic control, 8 well-controlled treated diabetic cats before and after glycemic control deteriorated, and 5 cats with diabetes mellitus before and after onset of stress-induced hyperglycemia.

Results

Mean serum fructosamine and blood GHb concentrations were significantly higher in untreated diabetic cats, compared with healthy cats, and in 24 poorly controlled diabetic cats, compared with 12 well-controlled diabetic cats. Mean serum fructosamine and blood GHb concentrations decreased significantly in 12 poorly controlled diabetic cats after improving glycemic control and increased significantly in 8 well-controlled diabetic cats after glycemic control deteriorated. A significant stress-induced increase in mean blood glucose concentration was evident 12 hours after insulin administration, but not in 5 docile diabetic cats that became fractious.

Clinical Implications

Serum fructosamine and blood GHb concentrations are clinically useful tools for monitoring control of glycemia in cats with diabetes mellitus. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1999;214:1794-1798)

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