Fragment reconstruction and bone plate fixation versus bridging plate fixation for treating highly comminuted femoral fractures in dogs: 35 cases (1987-1997)

Ann L. Johnson From the Departments of Veterinary Clinical Medicine (Johnson, Smith) and Veterinary Biosciences (Schaeffer), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802.

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C. W. Smith From the Departments of Veterinary Clinical Medicine (Johnson, Smith) and Veterinary Biosciences (Schaeffer), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802.

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David J. Schaeffer From the Departments of Veterinary Clinical Medicine (Johnson, Smith) and Veterinary Biosciences (Schaeffer), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802.

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Objective

To compare fragment reconstruction and bone plate fixation versus bridging plate fixation for treating highly comminuted (> 4 fragments) femoral fractures in dogs.

Design

Retrospective study.

Animals

35 dogs with highly comminuted fractures of the femur.

Procedure

Medical records of all dogs included in this study were reviewed. Dogs had been treated with fragment reconstruction and bone plate application (n = 20) or major fragment alignment and bridging plate fixation (15). Postoperative and follow-up radiographs were evaluated. Operating and hospitalization times, bone alignment, bone healing, and complications were considered.

Results

There were no differences in hospitalization times, limb alignment, and complications between dogs with fractures treated with fragment reconstruction and dogs with fractures treated with bridging plate fixation. Dogs with fractures treated with bridging plate fixation had shorter operative times and faster times to radiographic evidence of bone healing.

Clinical Implications

Bridging plate fixation is quicker to perform and results in faster healing than fragment reconstruction and bone plate fixation when used to treat comminuted femoral fractures. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998;213:1157-1161)

Objective

To compare fragment reconstruction and bone plate fixation versus bridging plate fixation for treating highly comminuted (> 4 fragments) femoral fractures in dogs.

Design

Retrospective study.

Animals

35 dogs with highly comminuted fractures of the femur.

Procedure

Medical records of all dogs included in this study were reviewed. Dogs had been treated with fragment reconstruction and bone plate application (n = 20) or major fragment alignment and bridging plate fixation (15). Postoperative and follow-up radiographs were evaluated. Operating and hospitalization times, bone alignment, bone healing, and complications were considered.

Results

There were no differences in hospitalization times, limb alignment, and complications between dogs with fractures treated with fragment reconstruction and dogs with fractures treated with bridging plate fixation. Dogs with fractures treated with bridging plate fixation had shorter operative times and faster times to radiographic evidence of bone healing.

Clinical Implications

Bridging plate fixation is quicker to perform and results in faster healing than fragment reconstruction and bone plate fixation when used to treat comminuted femoral fractures. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998;213:1157-1161)

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