Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for treatment of puppies with neutropenia secondary to canine parvovirus infection

Jennifer M. Rewerts From the Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.

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Dudley L. McCaw From the Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.

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Leah A. Cohn From the Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.

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Colette Wagner-Mann From the Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.

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Daniel Harrington From the Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.

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Objective—

To determine the effect of treatment with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) for puppies with neutropenia secondary to canine parvovirus infection.

Design—

Randomized controlled clinical trial.

Animals—

23 puppies.

Procedure—

Diagnosis was confirmed by use of an ELISA for detection of canine parvovirus antigen in feces, and all puppies received standard treatment for parvoviral enteritis. All puppies had neutropenia (< 1,000 neutrophils/μl) at the time of admission to the hospital or within 4 days afterward. Eleven puppies were treated with rhG-CSF daily until neutrophil count was > 1,500 cells/μl; the remaining 12 puppies were not treated with rhG-CSF.

Results—

We did not detect any significant differences between groups regarding duration of hospitalization, neutrophil count when neutropenia was first detected, lowest neutrophil count, or time until neutrophil count was > 1,500 cells/μl.

Clinical Implications—

Results suggest that treatment with rhG-CSF may not be beneficial in puppies with neutropenia secondary to canine parvovirus infection. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998:213:991-992)

Objective—

To determine the effect of treatment with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) for puppies with neutropenia secondary to canine parvovirus infection.

Design—

Randomized controlled clinical trial.

Animals—

23 puppies.

Procedure—

Diagnosis was confirmed by use of an ELISA for detection of canine parvovirus antigen in feces, and all puppies received standard treatment for parvoviral enteritis. All puppies had neutropenia (< 1,000 neutrophils/μl) at the time of admission to the hospital or within 4 days afterward. Eleven puppies were treated with rhG-CSF daily until neutrophil count was > 1,500 cells/μl; the remaining 12 puppies were not treated with rhG-CSF.

Results—

We did not detect any significant differences between groups regarding duration of hospitalization, neutrophil count when neutropenia was first detected, lowest neutrophil count, or time until neutrophil count was > 1,500 cells/μl.

Clinical Implications—

Results suggest that treatment with rhG-CSF may not be beneficial in puppies with neutropenia secondary to canine parvovirus infection. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998:213:991-992)

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