Prognostic importance of alkaline phosphatase activity in serum from dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma: 75 cases (1990-1996)

Nicole Ehrhart From the Departments of Veterinary Clinical Medicine (Ehrhart) and Veterinary Pathobiology (Hoffmann, Weigel), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801, and Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (Dernell, Powers, Withrow).

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William S. Dernell From the Departments of Veterinary Clinical Medicine (Ehrhart) and Veterinary Pathobiology (Hoffmann, Weigel), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801, and Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (Dernell, Powers, Withrow).

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Walter E. Hoffmann From the Departments of Veterinary Clinical Medicine (Ehrhart) and Veterinary Pathobiology (Hoffmann, Weigel), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801, and Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (Dernell, Powers, Withrow).

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Ronald M. Weigel From the Departments of Veterinary Clinical Medicine (Ehrhart) and Veterinary Pathobiology (Hoffmann, Weigel), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801, and Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (Dernell, Powers, Withrow).

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Barbara E. Powers From the Departments of Veterinary Clinical Medicine (Ehrhart) and Veterinary Pathobiology (Hoffmann, Weigel), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801, and Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (Dernell, Powers, Withrow).

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Stephen J. Withrow From the Departments of Veterinary Clinical Medicine (Ehrhart) and Veterinary Pathobiology (Hoffmann, Weigel), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801, and Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (Dernell, Powers, Withrow).

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Objective—

To determine whether alkaline phosphatase activity in dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma can be used as a prognostic indicator.

Design—

Retrospective study.

Animals—

75 dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma.

Procedure—

Serum total alkaline phosphatase (TALP) and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BALP) activities were determined from archival serum samples obtained at various times during treatment of appendicular osteosarcoma and follow-up evaluations. Associations among activities of TALP and BALP and survival and disease-free intervals, percentage of bone length involved with tumor, histologic subtype, and method of surgical treatment were evaluated.

Results—

High activities of TALP and BALP before surgery were significantly associated with shorter survival and disease-free intervals in dogs undergoing surgery (amputation or limb-sparing procedure) and adjuvant chemotherapy. Activity of BALP significantly decreased in 29 dogs for which postoperative samples were available. Failure of BALP activity to decrease after surgery was correlated with shorter survival and disease-free intervals.

Clinical Implications—

Activities of TALP and BALP in serum are important prognostic factors for appendicular osteosarcoma in dogs. Prognostic factors may help clinicians initiate more aggressive treatment for dogs that are at higher risk of death or relapse. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998:213:1002-1006)

Objective—

To determine whether alkaline phosphatase activity in dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma can be used as a prognostic indicator.

Design—

Retrospective study.

Animals—

75 dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma.

Procedure—

Serum total alkaline phosphatase (TALP) and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BALP) activities were determined from archival serum samples obtained at various times during treatment of appendicular osteosarcoma and follow-up evaluations. Associations among activities of TALP and BALP and survival and disease-free intervals, percentage of bone length involved with tumor, histologic subtype, and method of surgical treatment were evaluated.

Results—

High activities of TALP and BALP before surgery were significantly associated with shorter survival and disease-free intervals in dogs undergoing surgery (amputation or limb-sparing procedure) and adjuvant chemotherapy. Activity of BALP significantly decreased in 29 dogs for which postoperative samples were available. Failure of BALP activity to decrease after surgery was correlated with shorter survival and disease-free intervals.

Clinical Implications—

Activities of TALP and BALP in serum are important prognostic factors for appendicular osteosarcoma in dogs. Prognostic factors may help clinicians initiate more aggressive treatment for dogs that are at higher risk of death or relapse. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998:213:1002-1006)

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