Use of a handheld device for analysis of blood electrolyte concentrations and blood gas partial pressures in dogs and horses

Andrea L. Looney From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853.

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John Ludders From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853.

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Hollis N. Erb From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853.

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Robin Gleed From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853.

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Paula Moon From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853.

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Objective

To compare, for blood samples from dogs and horses, blood electrolyte concentrations, blood gas partial pressures, and Hct obtained using a handheld analyzer with those obtained using a standard chemistry analyzer and to compare results obtained with the handheld analyzer using warm versus cold test cartridges.

Design

Case series with analysis of split samples.

Sample Population

Blood samples from 22 dogs and 17 horses.

Procedure

Sodium, potassium, ionized calcium, bicarbonate, and total CO2 concentrations, pH, Po2, Pco2, base excess, and Hct were determined by use of a handheld analyzer and test cartridges that had been allowed to warm to ambient temperature or had been recently removed from a refrigerator. Results were compared with those from a standard chemistry analyzer by use of linear regression.

Results

For canine samples, values obtained with the handheld analyzer and warm cartridges were highly correlated (r2 ≥ 0.83) with values obtained with the standard chemistry analyzer, except for sodium concentration (r2 = 0.6). For equine samples, values obtained with the handheld analyzer and warm cartridges were highly correlated (r2 ≥ 0.79) with values obtained with the standard chemistry analyzer, except for Hct (r2 = 0.38). For all samples, results obtained with cold and warm cartridges were moderately correlated (r2 ≥ 0.69).

Clinical Implications

Results obtained with the handheld analyzer were similar to those obtained from the standard chemistry analyzer, with the exception of sodium concentration for canine samples and Hct for equine samples. Results were not substantially affected by use of cold, rather than warm, test cartridges. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998;213:526-530)

Objective

To compare, for blood samples from dogs and horses, blood electrolyte concentrations, blood gas partial pressures, and Hct obtained using a handheld analyzer with those obtained using a standard chemistry analyzer and to compare results obtained with the handheld analyzer using warm versus cold test cartridges.

Design

Case series with analysis of split samples.

Sample Population

Blood samples from 22 dogs and 17 horses.

Procedure

Sodium, potassium, ionized calcium, bicarbonate, and total CO2 concentrations, pH, Po2, Pco2, base excess, and Hct were determined by use of a handheld analyzer and test cartridges that had been allowed to warm to ambient temperature or had been recently removed from a refrigerator. Results were compared with those from a standard chemistry analyzer by use of linear regression.

Results

For canine samples, values obtained with the handheld analyzer and warm cartridges were highly correlated (r2 ≥ 0.83) with values obtained with the standard chemistry analyzer, except for sodium concentration (r2 = 0.6). For equine samples, values obtained with the handheld analyzer and warm cartridges were highly correlated (r2 ≥ 0.79) with values obtained with the standard chemistry analyzer, except for Hct (r2 = 0.38). For all samples, results obtained with cold and warm cartridges were moderately correlated (r2 ≥ 0.69).

Clinical Implications

Results obtained with the handheld analyzer were similar to those obtained from the standard chemistry analyzer, with the exception of sodium concentration for canine samples and Hct for equine samples. Results were not substantially affected by use of cold, rather than warm, test cartridges. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998;213:526-530)

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