Comparison of topical administration of clotrimazole through surgically placed versus nonsurgically placed catheters for treatment of nasal aspergillosis in dogs: 60 cases (1990-1996)

Kyle G. Mathews From the Departments of Surgical and Radiological Sciences (Mathews, Koblik, Richardson, Komtebedde), Medicine and Epidemiology (Davidson), and Population Health and Reproduction (Kass), School of Veterinary Medicine, and Department of Microbiology and Immunology (Pappagianis), School of Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, and Shaman Pharmaceuticals Inc, 213 E Grand Ave, South San Francisco, CA 94080 (Hector).

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Autumn P. Davidson From the Departments of Surgical and Radiological Sciences (Mathews, Koblik, Richardson, Komtebedde), Medicine and Epidemiology (Davidson), and Population Health and Reproduction (Kass), School of Veterinary Medicine, and Department of Microbiology and Immunology (Pappagianis), School of Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, and Shaman Pharmaceuticals Inc, 213 E Grand Ave, South San Francisco, CA 94080 (Hector).

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Philip D. Koblik From the Departments of Surgical and Radiological Sciences (Mathews, Koblik, Richardson, Komtebedde), Medicine and Epidemiology (Davidson), and Population Health and Reproduction (Kass), School of Veterinary Medicine, and Department of Microbiology and Immunology (Pappagianis), School of Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, and Shaman Pharmaceuticals Inc, 213 E Grand Ave, South San Francisco, CA 94080 (Hector).

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Elisabeth E Richardson From the Departments of Surgical and Radiological Sciences (Mathews, Koblik, Richardson, Komtebedde), Medicine and Epidemiology (Davidson), and Population Health and Reproduction (Kass), School of Veterinary Medicine, and Department of Microbiology and Immunology (Pappagianis), School of Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, and Shaman Pharmaceuticals Inc, 213 E Grand Ave, South San Francisco, CA 94080 (Hector).

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Jan Komtebedde From the Departments of Surgical and Radiological Sciences (Mathews, Koblik, Richardson, Komtebedde), Medicine and Epidemiology (Davidson), and Population Health and Reproduction (Kass), School of Veterinary Medicine, and Department of Microbiology and Immunology (Pappagianis), School of Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, and Shaman Pharmaceuticals Inc, 213 E Grand Ave, South San Francisco, CA 94080 (Hector).

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Demosthenes Pappagianis From the Departments of Surgical and Radiological Sciences (Mathews, Koblik, Richardson, Komtebedde), Medicine and Epidemiology (Davidson), and Population Health and Reproduction (Kass), School of Veterinary Medicine, and Department of Microbiology and Immunology (Pappagianis), School of Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, and Shaman Pharmaceuticals Inc, 213 E Grand Ave, South San Francisco, CA 94080 (Hector).

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Richard E Hector From the Departments of Surgical and Radiological Sciences (Mathews, Koblik, Richardson, Komtebedde), Medicine and Epidemiology (Davidson), and Population Health and Reproduction (Kass), School of Veterinary Medicine, and Department of Microbiology and Immunology (Pappagianis), School of Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, and Shaman Pharmaceuticals Inc, 213 E Grand Ave, South San Francisco, CA 94080 (Hector).

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Philip H. Kass From the Departments of Surgical and Radiological Sciences (Mathews, Koblik, Richardson, Komtebedde), Medicine and Epidemiology (Davidson), and Population Health and Reproduction (Kass), School of Veterinary Medicine, and Department of Microbiology and Immunology (Pappagianis), School of Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, and Shaman Pharmaceuticals Inc, 213 E Grand Ave, South San Francisco, CA 94080 (Hector).

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Objective

To examine the clinical response to topical administration of clotrimazole in dogs with nasal aspergillosis, to compare effect of surgically placed versus nonsurgically placed catheters used for administration on outcome, and to examine whether subjective scoring of computed tomographic images can predict outcome.

Design

Retrospective case series.

Animals

60 dogs with nasal aspergillosis.

Procedure

Information including signalment, history, diagnostics, treatment method, and outcome was retrieved from medical records of dogs with nasal aspergillosis treated between 1990 and 1996 at the University of California School of Veterinary Medicine or cooperating referral practices. Final outcome was determined by telephone conversations with owners and referring veterinarians. Images obtained before treatment were subjectively assessed to develop an algorithm for predicting outcome.

Results

Clotrimazole solution (1 %) was infused during a 1-hour period via catheters surgically placed in the frontal sinus and nose (27 dogs) and via nonsurgically placed catheters in the nose (18). An additional 15 dogs received 2 to 4 infusions by either route. Topical administration of clotrimazole resulted in resolution of clinical disease in 65% of dogs after 1 treatment and 87% of dogs after one or more treatments. The scoring system correctly classified dogs with unfavorable and favorable responses 71 to 78% and 79 to 93% of the time, respectively.

Clinical Implications

Topical administration of clotrimazole, using either technique, was an effective treatment for nasal aspergillosis in dogs. Use of non-invasive intranasal infusion of clotrimazole eliminated the need for surgical trephination of frontal sinuses in many dogs and was associated with fewer complications.(J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998;213:501-506)

Objective

To examine the clinical response to topical administration of clotrimazole in dogs with nasal aspergillosis, to compare effect of surgically placed versus nonsurgically placed catheters used for administration on outcome, and to examine whether subjective scoring of computed tomographic images can predict outcome.

Design

Retrospective case series.

Animals

60 dogs with nasal aspergillosis.

Procedure

Information including signalment, history, diagnostics, treatment method, and outcome was retrieved from medical records of dogs with nasal aspergillosis treated between 1990 and 1996 at the University of California School of Veterinary Medicine or cooperating referral practices. Final outcome was determined by telephone conversations with owners and referring veterinarians. Images obtained before treatment were subjectively assessed to develop an algorithm for predicting outcome.

Results

Clotrimazole solution (1 %) was infused during a 1-hour period via catheters surgically placed in the frontal sinus and nose (27 dogs) and via nonsurgically placed catheters in the nose (18). An additional 15 dogs received 2 to 4 infusions by either route. Topical administration of clotrimazole resulted in resolution of clinical disease in 65% of dogs after 1 treatment and 87% of dogs after one or more treatments. The scoring system correctly classified dogs with unfavorable and favorable responses 71 to 78% and 79 to 93% of the time, respectively.

Clinical Implications

Topical administration of clotrimazole, using either technique, was an effective treatment for nasal aspergillosis in dogs. Use of non-invasive intranasal infusion of clotrimazole eliminated the need for surgical trephination of frontal sinuses in many dogs and was associated with fewer complications.(J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998;213:501-506)

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