Reference values for glucose tolerance and glucose tolerance status in cats

Karl R. J. Link From the Division of Companion Animal Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Science, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane Qld 4072, Australia.

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Jacqueline S. Rand From the Division of Companion Animal Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Science, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane Qld 4072, Australia.

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Objective

To determine the reference range for glucose tolerance, using a simplified glucose tolerance test (GTT), and to evaluate glucose tolerance status in cats.

Design

Prospective study.

Animals

57 clinically normal cats.

Procedure

2 catheters were placed in the cephalic veins of nonsedated cats at least 3 hours before the test. Blood samples were obtained before (0 minutes) and 2, 5, 10, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after glucose (0.5 g/kg [0.23 g/lb] of body weight) was injected IV. Blood glucose concentration was measured by a glucose meter. Glucose half-life (t½) and disappearance of glucose (Kglucose) were calculated.

Results

Glucose tolerance in cats was considered normal when upper limits for glucose concentration were ≤ 159 mg/dl at 0 minutes, ≤ 322 mg/dl at 60 minutes, ≤ 238 mg/dl at 90 minutes, or ≤ 171 mg/dl at 120 minutes and glucose t½ was ≤ 94.7 minutes or Kglucose was ≥ 0.41 %/min. Impaired glucose tolerance in cats was defined as a glucose concentration ≥ 160 mg/dl at 0 minutes, ≥ 323 mg/dl at 60 minutes, ≥ 239 mg/dl at 90 minutes, or ≥ 172 mg/dl at 120 minutes. The frequency of impaired glucose tolerance was 2%. Five cats had stress-affected GTT. Significant differences in glucose t½ or Kglucose between cats < 7 and ≥ 7 years old were not found.

Clinical Implications

The simplified GTT and measurement of glucose concentration by a glucose meter provides a simple and low-cost method of assessing glucose tolerance status in cats that are normoglycemic after food is withheld. Use of absolute glucose concentrations overcomes the need to calculate glucose t½ values. The high glucose concentration at 0 minutes found in this study may reflect a more realistic concentration to use in assessing client-owned cats in a hospital environment. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998;213:492-496)

Objective

To determine the reference range for glucose tolerance, using a simplified glucose tolerance test (GTT), and to evaluate glucose tolerance status in cats.

Design

Prospective study.

Animals

57 clinically normal cats.

Procedure

2 catheters were placed in the cephalic veins of nonsedated cats at least 3 hours before the test. Blood samples were obtained before (0 minutes) and 2, 5, 10, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after glucose (0.5 g/kg [0.23 g/lb] of body weight) was injected IV. Blood glucose concentration was measured by a glucose meter. Glucose half-life (t½) and disappearance of glucose (Kglucose) were calculated.

Results

Glucose tolerance in cats was considered normal when upper limits for glucose concentration were ≤ 159 mg/dl at 0 minutes, ≤ 322 mg/dl at 60 minutes, ≤ 238 mg/dl at 90 minutes, or ≤ 171 mg/dl at 120 minutes and glucose t½ was ≤ 94.7 minutes or Kglucose was ≥ 0.41 %/min. Impaired glucose tolerance in cats was defined as a glucose concentration ≥ 160 mg/dl at 0 minutes, ≥ 323 mg/dl at 60 minutes, ≥ 239 mg/dl at 90 minutes, or ≥ 172 mg/dl at 120 minutes. The frequency of impaired glucose tolerance was 2%. Five cats had stress-affected GTT. Significant differences in glucose t½ or Kglucose between cats < 7 and ≥ 7 years old were not found.

Clinical Implications

The simplified GTT and measurement of glucose concentration by a glucose meter provides a simple and low-cost method of assessing glucose tolerance status in cats that are normoglycemic after food is withheld. Use of absolute glucose concentrations overcomes the need to calculate glucose t½ values. The high glucose concentration at 0 minutes found in this study may reflect a more realistic concentration to use in assessing client-owned cats in a hospital environment. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998;213:492-496)

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