Concurrent abomasal displacement and perforating ulceration in cattle: 21 cases (1985–1996)

Christina S. Cable From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-6401.

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William C. Rebhun From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-6401.

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Susan L. Fubini From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-6401.

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Hollis N. Erb From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-6401.

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Norm G. Ducharme From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-6401.

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Objective

To evaluate the association of physical examination and clinicopathologic findings with surgical findings in cattle with concurrent abomasal displacement and perforating ulceration, to determine short- and long-term survival rates in these cattle, and to determine whether degree of peritonitis (focal vs diffuse) influences survival rates.

Design

Retrospective study.

Animals

21 cattle with concurrent abomasal displacement and perforating ulceration and 42 cattle with uncomplicated abomasal displacement.

Procedure

Information on signalment, stage of lactation, physical examination findings, clinicopathologic data, surgical diagnosis, procedure(s) performed, and necropsy findings were retrieved from medical records of all cattle included in this study. Differences between physical examination findings of cattle with concurrent disease and those of cattle with uncomplicated displacements were evaluated, as were differences between survival rates in cattle with focal versus diffuse peritonitis.

Results

Cattle with concurrent disease had a greater probability of having pneumoperitoneum and signs of abdominal pain identified on physical examination than did cattle with uncomplicated diseases. There was no relationship between clinicopathologic data and survival time. Short-term survival rate was 38%, and degree of peritonitis significantly influenced survival time in cattle with concurrent abomasal displacement and perforating ulceration. Long-term survival rate in these cattle was 14%.

Clinical Implications

Cattle with concurrent displaced abomasum and perforating ulceration have a poor chance for survival. In addition to detection of displaced abomasum, physical examination findings that can help lead to a presurgical diagnosis of this syndrome are pneumoperitoneum and signs of abdominal pain. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998;212: 1442–1445)

Objective

To evaluate the association of physical examination and clinicopathologic findings with surgical findings in cattle with concurrent abomasal displacement and perforating ulceration, to determine short- and long-term survival rates in these cattle, and to determine whether degree of peritonitis (focal vs diffuse) influences survival rates.

Design

Retrospective study.

Animals

21 cattle with concurrent abomasal displacement and perforating ulceration and 42 cattle with uncomplicated abomasal displacement.

Procedure

Information on signalment, stage of lactation, physical examination findings, clinicopathologic data, surgical diagnosis, procedure(s) performed, and necropsy findings were retrieved from medical records of all cattle included in this study. Differences between physical examination findings of cattle with concurrent disease and those of cattle with uncomplicated displacements were evaluated, as were differences between survival rates in cattle with focal versus diffuse peritonitis.

Results

Cattle with concurrent disease had a greater probability of having pneumoperitoneum and signs of abdominal pain identified on physical examination than did cattle with uncomplicated diseases. There was no relationship between clinicopathologic data and survival time. Short-term survival rate was 38%, and degree of peritonitis significantly influenced survival time in cattle with concurrent abomasal displacement and perforating ulceration. Long-term survival rate in these cattle was 14%.

Clinical Implications

Cattle with concurrent displaced abomasum and perforating ulceration have a poor chance for survival. In addition to detection of displaced abomasum, physical examination findings that can help lead to a presurgical diagnosis of this syndrome are pneumoperitoneum and signs of abdominal pain. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998;212: 1442–1445)

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