Evaluation of microcytosis in 18 Shibas

Jody L. Gookin From the Departments of Companion Animal and Special Species Medicine (Gookin, Bunch, Rush) and Microbiology, Parasitology, and Pathology (Grindem), College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606.

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Susan E. Bunch From the Departments of Companion Animal and Special Species Medicine (Gookin, Bunch, Rush) and Microbiology, Parasitology, and Pathology (Grindem), College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606.

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Laura J. Rush From the Departments of Companion Animal and Special Species Medicine (Gookin, Bunch, Rush) and Microbiology, Parasitology, and Pathology (Grindem), College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606.

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Carol B. Grindem From the Departments of Companion Animal and Special Species Medicine (Gookin, Bunch, Rush) and Microbiology, Parasitology, and Pathology (Grindem), College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606.

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Objective

To determine whether microcytosis is a typical finding in Shibas.

Design

Prospective study.

Animals

18 Shibas.

Procedure

Blood and serum samples were obtained for automated hematologic analyses (18 dogs) and for determination of ferritin concentration, using ELISA (14 dogs). Blood samples from 30 clinically normal dogs of various other breeds was analyzed to establish a reference range for ferritin concentration.

Results

Erythrocyte mean corpuscular volume in Shibas ranged from 55.6 to 69.1 fl (mean ± SD, 61.2 ± 4.3 fl; median, 60.6 fl; reference range, 63 to 73 fl). Microcytosis was identified in 12 of 18 dogs. Males and females were affected equally. Mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration was slightly low (range, 32.0 to 33.9%; reference range, 34 to 38%) in 6 dogs, 4 of which had microcytic RBC. Serum ferritin concentrations ranged from 61.2 to 277.0 ng/ml (mean ± SD, 110.6 ± 51.4 ng/ml; median, 106 ng/ml). Reference range for serum ferritin concentration was 50.7 to 440.0 ng/ml (mean ± SD, 121.2 ± 67.1 ng/ml; median, 111.5 ng/ml). Thrombocytopenia (range, 110,000 to 196,000 platelets; reference range, 200,000 to 450,000 platelets) was found in 7 dogs, 6 of which also had microcytic RBC.

Clinical Implications

Microcytosis can be a typical finding in Shibas. Common origin of Shibas and Akitas, a breed predisposed to microcytosis, suggests a hereditary basis for this finding. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998;212: 1258–1259)

Objective

To determine whether microcytosis is a typical finding in Shibas.

Design

Prospective study.

Animals

18 Shibas.

Procedure

Blood and serum samples were obtained for automated hematologic analyses (18 dogs) and for determination of ferritin concentration, using ELISA (14 dogs). Blood samples from 30 clinically normal dogs of various other breeds was analyzed to establish a reference range for ferritin concentration.

Results

Erythrocyte mean corpuscular volume in Shibas ranged from 55.6 to 69.1 fl (mean ± SD, 61.2 ± 4.3 fl; median, 60.6 fl; reference range, 63 to 73 fl). Microcytosis was identified in 12 of 18 dogs. Males and females were affected equally. Mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration was slightly low (range, 32.0 to 33.9%; reference range, 34 to 38%) in 6 dogs, 4 of which had microcytic RBC. Serum ferritin concentrations ranged from 61.2 to 277.0 ng/ml (mean ± SD, 110.6 ± 51.4 ng/ml; median, 106 ng/ml). Reference range for serum ferritin concentration was 50.7 to 440.0 ng/ml (mean ± SD, 121.2 ± 67.1 ng/ml; median, 111.5 ng/ml). Thrombocytopenia (range, 110,000 to 196,000 platelets; reference range, 200,000 to 450,000 platelets) was found in 7 dogs, 6 of which also had microcytic RBC.

Clinical Implications

Microcytosis can be a typical finding in Shibas. Common origin of Shibas and Akitas, a breed predisposed to microcytosis, suggests a hereditary basis for this finding. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998;212: 1258–1259)

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