Tuberculosis in adult beef cattle of Mexican origin shipped direct-to-slaughter into Texas

William H. Brown From the Texas Animal Health Commission, Bi-National Liaison Office, 7209 E Saunders, Ste 3, Laredo, TX 78041, and 1716 S San Marcos, Rm 15, San Antonio, TX 78207 (Brown, Hernández de Anda); the Instituto de Investigaciones en Ciencias Veterinarias, Universidad Autonoma de Baja California, Obregon y J Carrillo s/n, Mexicali, BC, Mexico 21100 (Hernández de Anda).

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Jorge Hernández de Anda From the Texas Animal Health Commission, Bi-National Liaison Office, 7209 E Saunders, Ste 3, Laredo, TX 78041, and 1716 S San Marcos, Rm 15, San Antonio, TX 78207 (Brown, Hernández de Anda); the Instituto de Investigaciones en Ciencias Veterinarias, Universidad Autonoma de Baja California, Obregon y J Carrillo s/n, Mexicali, BC, Mexico 21100 (Hernández de Anda).

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 MVZ, MPVM, PhD

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Objective

To evaluate differences in prevalence of tuberculosis (TB) in adult beef cattle that originated from different states in Mexico and were shipped direct-to-slaughter into Texas in 1995.

Design

Epidemiologic survey.

Animals

Approximately 65,000 adult beef cattle.

Procedures

Postmortem examinations of carcasses for detection of Mycobacterium bovis infection were conducted at slaughter plants in Texas. Specimens were collected from cattle with granulomatous lesions, stored in neutral-buffered 10% formalin or saturated sodium borate solution, and processed for histologic and bacteriologic diagnosis. Prevalence and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by state of origin. Difference between prevalences for different states was tested for significance (P< 0.05), using the proportion test.

Results

Overall prevalence of TB at slaughter in adult beef cattle that originated from Mexico was approximately 0.5/1,000 (34/65,233). Prevalence of TB in cattle that originated from Chihuahua (0.07) was significantly lower than that in cattle from Coahuila (0.80), Nuevo Leon (1.27), and Tamaulipas (1.81).

Clinical Implications

Prevalence of M bovis infection in adult beef cattle may be significantly different between states in the northern border region of Mexico. On the basis of disease prevalence and numbers of exported cattle and provided safeguards such as TB testing are continued, cattle from Chihuahua may pose a lower risk of TB transmission to Texas cattle than do cattle from Coahuila, Nuevo Leon, and Tamaulipas. To allow interstate/international movement of cattle from northern border states of Mexico, TB testing requirements should be continued. In the context of international trade, southern border states of the United States should continue collaborating with northern border states of Mexico to control and eradicate this disease. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998; 212:557-559)

Objective

To evaluate differences in prevalence of tuberculosis (TB) in adult beef cattle that originated from different states in Mexico and were shipped direct-to-slaughter into Texas in 1995.

Design

Epidemiologic survey.

Animals

Approximately 65,000 adult beef cattle.

Procedures

Postmortem examinations of carcasses for detection of Mycobacterium bovis infection were conducted at slaughter plants in Texas. Specimens were collected from cattle with granulomatous lesions, stored in neutral-buffered 10% formalin or saturated sodium borate solution, and processed for histologic and bacteriologic diagnosis. Prevalence and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by state of origin. Difference between prevalences for different states was tested for significance (P< 0.05), using the proportion test.

Results

Overall prevalence of TB at slaughter in adult beef cattle that originated from Mexico was approximately 0.5/1,000 (34/65,233). Prevalence of TB in cattle that originated from Chihuahua (0.07) was significantly lower than that in cattle from Coahuila (0.80), Nuevo Leon (1.27), and Tamaulipas (1.81).

Clinical Implications

Prevalence of M bovis infection in adult beef cattle may be significantly different between states in the northern border region of Mexico. On the basis of disease prevalence and numbers of exported cattle and provided safeguards such as TB testing are continued, cattle from Chihuahua may pose a lower risk of TB transmission to Texas cattle than do cattle from Coahuila, Nuevo Leon, and Tamaulipas. To allow interstate/international movement of cattle from northern border states of Mexico, TB testing requirements should be continued. In the context of international trade, southern border states of the United States should continue collaborating with northern border states of Mexico to control and eradicate this disease. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998; 212:557-559)

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