Monitoring adequacy of ventilation by capnometry during thoracotomy in dogs

Ann E. Wagner From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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James S. Gaynor From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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Colin I. Dunlop From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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Sandra L. Allen From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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Wendy C. Demme From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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Objective

To determine whether end-tidal partial pressure of carbon dioxide (Petco 2) was a reliable estimate of Paco2 in dogs undergoing thoracotomy.

Design

Case series.

Animals

18 dogs that underwent thoracotomy.

Procedure

Paco2 and Petco 2 were measured shortly after induction of anesthesia, while dogs were breathing spontaneously; 5 minutes prior to initial skin incision, while dogs were receiving intermittent positive-pressure ventilation (IPPV); 5, 30, and 60 minutes after the thoracic cavity was opened, while dogs were receiving IPPV; and after the thoracic cavity was closed and evacuated, when dogs were again breathing spontaneously. For each period, arterial-end-tidal difference in partial pressure of carbon dioxide (Paco2-Petco 2) was compared with Paco2-Petco 2 for the preceding period.

Results

Significant changes in Paco2-Petco 2 from one period to the next were not detected except when values obtained 5 minutes after the thoracic cavity was opened were compared with values obtained 5 minutes before incision. The Paco2-Petco 2 was not constant for individual dogs.

Clinical Implications

Petco 2 was not a reliable indicator of adequacy of ventilation during thoracotomy in these dogs, because it differed greatly from Paco2, and Pac02-PETC02 was not consistent. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998; 212:377-379)

Objective

To determine whether end-tidal partial pressure of carbon dioxide (Petco 2) was a reliable estimate of Paco2 in dogs undergoing thoracotomy.

Design

Case series.

Animals

18 dogs that underwent thoracotomy.

Procedure

Paco2 and Petco 2 were measured shortly after induction of anesthesia, while dogs were breathing spontaneously; 5 minutes prior to initial skin incision, while dogs were receiving intermittent positive-pressure ventilation (IPPV); 5, 30, and 60 minutes after the thoracic cavity was opened, while dogs were receiving IPPV; and after the thoracic cavity was closed and evacuated, when dogs were again breathing spontaneously. For each period, arterial-end-tidal difference in partial pressure of carbon dioxide (Paco2-Petco 2) was compared with Paco2-Petco 2 for the preceding period.

Results

Significant changes in Paco2-Petco 2 from one period to the next were not detected except when values obtained 5 minutes after the thoracic cavity was opened were compared with values obtained 5 minutes before incision. The Paco2-Petco 2 was not constant for individual dogs.

Clinical Implications

Petco 2 was not a reliable indicator of adequacy of ventilation during thoracotomy in these dogs, because it differed greatly from Paco2, and Pac02-PETC02 was not consistent. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998; 212:377-379)

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