Effect of intracameral administration of carbachol on the postoperative increase in intraocular pressure in dogs undergoing cataract extraction

Charles M. Stuhr From the Departments or Surgical (Stuhr, Miller, Murphy, Schoster) and Pathobiological Sciences (Thomas), School or Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706-1102.

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Paul E. Miller From the Departments or Surgical (Stuhr, Miller, Murphy, Schoster) and Pathobiological Sciences (Thomas), School or Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706-1102.

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Christopher J. Murphy From the Departments or Surgical (Stuhr, Miller, Murphy, Schoster) and Pathobiological Sciences (Thomas), School or Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706-1102.

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James V. Schoster From the Departments or Surgical (Stuhr, Miller, Murphy, Schoster) and Pathobiological Sciences (Thomas), School or Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706-1102.

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Chester B. Thomas From the Departments or Surgical (Stuhr, Miller, Murphy, Schoster) and Pathobiological Sciences (Thomas), School or Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706-1102.

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Objective

To determine whether intracameral injection of carbachol at the completion of phacoemulsification in dogs would prevent the increase in intraocular pressure (IOP) that can develop during the first 24 hours after surgery.

Design

Randomized controlled trial.

Animals

32 adult dogs undergoing elective unilateral or bilateral phacoemulsification.

Procedure

Dogs were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups with 8 dogs/group: phacoemulsification and intracameral administration of 0.5 ml of 0.01 % carbachol at the end of surgery; phacoemulsification, intraocular lens implantation, and intracameral administration of 0.5 ml of 0.01 % carbachol; phacoemulsification and intracameral administration of 0.5 ml of balanced salt solution; and phacoemulsification, intraocular lens implantation, and intracameral administration of 0.5 ml of balanced salt solution. Intraocular pressure was measured at 3 and 6 hours and the morning after surgery. Aqueous flare was also measured 6 hours and the morning after surgery.

Results

None of the dogs treated with carbachol developed postoperative ocular hypertension (ie, IOP > 27 mm of Hg), whereas 12 of 16 control dogs had ocular hypertension 3 hours after surgery. Intraocular pressure 3 hours after surgery was not significantly associated with phacoemulsification time or phacoemulsification power or with whether the dog received an intraocular lens implant. Severity of aqueous flare was similar for treated and control dogs.

Clinical Implications

Results suggested that intracameral administration of 0.01 % carbachol at the end of surgery was a safe and efficacious method of preventing the postoperative increase in IOP associated with phacoemulsification in dogs. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998;212:1885–1888)

Objective

To determine whether intracameral injection of carbachol at the completion of phacoemulsification in dogs would prevent the increase in intraocular pressure (IOP) that can develop during the first 24 hours after surgery.

Design

Randomized controlled trial.

Animals

32 adult dogs undergoing elective unilateral or bilateral phacoemulsification.

Procedure

Dogs were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups with 8 dogs/group: phacoemulsification and intracameral administration of 0.5 ml of 0.01 % carbachol at the end of surgery; phacoemulsification, intraocular lens implantation, and intracameral administration of 0.5 ml of 0.01 % carbachol; phacoemulsification and intracameral administration of 0.5 ml of balanced salt solution; and phacoemulsification, intraocular lens implantation, and intracameral administration of 0.5 ml of balanced salt solution. Intraocular pressure was measured at 3 and 6 hours and the morning after surgery. Aqueous flare was also measured 6 hours and the morning after surgery.

Results

None of the dogs treated with carbachol developed postoperative ocular hypertension (ie, IOP > 27 mm of Hg), whereas 12 of 16 control dogs had ocular hypertension 3 hours after surgery. Intraocular pressure 3 hours after surgery was not significantly associated with phacoemulsification time or phacoemulsification power or with whether the dog received an intraocular lens implant. Severity of aqueous flare was similar for treated and control dogs.

Clinical Implications

Results suggested that intracameral administration of 0.01 % carbachol at the end of surgery was a safe and efficacious method of preventing the postoperative increase in IOP associated with phacoemulsification in dogs. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998;212:1885–1888)

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