Effect of time of sample collection on serum thyroid-stimulating hormone concentrations in euthyroid and hypothyroid dogs

Joseph M. Bruner From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1240.

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J. Catharine R. Scott-Moncrieff From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1240.

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David A. Williams From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1240.

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 Vet MB, PhD

Objective

To determine effect of time of sample collection on serum thyrotropin (canine thyroid-stimulating hormone [cTSH]) concentrations in euthyroid and hypothyroid dogs.

Design

Prospective study.

Animals

6 healthy adult euthyroid dogs, 6 adult Beagles with 131iodine-induced hypothyroidism before and during administration of levothyroxine sodium, and 6 adult dogs with naturally developing hypothyroidism.

Procedure

Healthy euthyroid dogs were identified. Hypothyroidism was induced by administration of 131sodium iodide and confirmed by thyroid-stimulating hormone testing. These dogs then received levothyroxine for 30 days. Naturally developing hypothyroidism was diagnosed on the basis of clinical signs, low serum thyroxine (T 4) concentrations, and high cTSH concentrations or abnormal results on a thyrotropin-releasing hormone response test. Samples for measurement of cTSH and T4 concentrations were obtained at 2-hour intervals from 8 AM to 8 pm.

Results

Mean (± SD) serum cTSH concentrations for healthy dogs, dogs with induced hypothyroidism before and during treatment, and dogs with naturally developing hypothyroidism were 0.11 ± 0.08, 3.31 ± 1.30, 0.08 ± 0.07, and 0.55 ± 0.27 ng/ml, respectively. Diurnal variation in cTSH concentrations was not detected. Clinically important random fluctuations in cTSH concentrations were detected for dogs with naturally developing hypothyroidism.

Clinical Implications

Sample collection time does not appear to predictably influence cTSH concentrations; however, dogs with naturally developing hypothyroidism may have random fluctuations in cTSH concentrations. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998; 212:1572–1575)

Objective

To determine effect of time of sample collection on serum thyrotropin (canine thyroid-stimulating hormone [cTSH]) concentrations in euthyroid and hypothyroid dogs.

Design

Prospective study.

Animals

6 healthy adult euthyroid dogs, 6 adult Beagles with 131iodine-induced hypothyroidism before and during administration of levothyroxine sodium, and 6 adult dogs with naturally developing hypothyroidism.

Procedure

Healthy euthyroid dogs were identified. Hypothyroidism was induced by administration of 131sodium iodide and confirmed by thyroid-stimulating hormone testing. These dogs then received levothyroxine for 30 days. Naturally developing hypothyroidism was diagnosed on the basis of clinical signs, low serum thyroxine (T 4) concentrations, and high cTSH concentrations or abnormal results on a thyrotropin-releasing hormone response test. Samples for measurement of cTSH and T4 concentrations were obtained at 2-hour intervals from 8 AM to 8 pm.

Results

Mean (± SD) serum cTSH concentrations for healthy dogs, dogs with induced hypothyroidism before and during treatment, and dogs with naturally developing hypothyroidism were 0.11 ± 0.08, 3.31 ± 1.30, 0.08 ± 0.07, and 0.55 ± 0.27 ng/ml, respectively. Diurnal variation in cTSH concentrations was not detected. Clinically important random fluctuations in cTSH concentrations were detected for dogs with naturally developing hypothyroidism.

Clinical Implications

Sample collection time does not appear to predictably influence cTSH concentrations; however, dogs with naturally developing hypothyroidism may have random fluctuations in cTSH concentrations. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998; 212:1572–1575)

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