Comparison of serum cortisol concentrations in clinically normal dogs after administration of freshly reconstituted versus reconstituted and stored frozen cosyntropin

Linda A. Frank From the Departments of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Frank) and Comparative Medicine (Oliver), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37901-1071.

Search for other papers by Linda A. Frank in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 MS, DVM
and
Jack W. Oliver From the Departments of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Frank) and Comparative Medicine (Oliver), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37901-1071.

Search for other papers by Jack W. Oliver in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD

Click on author name to view affiliation information

Objective

To evaluate the biological stability of reconstituted cosyntropin after storage at −20 C for 2, 4, and 6 months.

Design

Prospective study.

Animals

10 clinically normal dogs.

Procedure

Serum cortisol concentrations in dogs were determined before and 1 hour after administration of freshly reconstituted cosyntropin (synthetic ACTH) or cosyntropin that had been reconstituted and stored frozen at −20 C in plastic syringes for 2, 4, and 6 months. Cosyntropin was administered at 5 μg/kg (2.3 μg/lb) of body weight, IV.

Results

Baseline serum cortisol concentrations were similar at each sampling time. Compared with the effects of freshly reconstituted cosyntropin, administration of cosyntropin that had been frozen did not have a significantly different effect on serum cortisol concentrations.

Clinical lmplications

Cosyntropin can be reconstituted and stored frozen at −20 C in plastic syringes for 6 months with no adverse effects on bioactivity of the polypeptide. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998;212: 1569–1571)

Objective

To evaluate the biological stability of reconstituted cosyntropin after storage at −20 C for 2, 4, and 6 months.

Design

Prospective study.

Animals

10 clinically normal dogs.

Procedure

Serum cortisol concentrations in dogs were determined before and 1 hour after administration of freshly reconstituted cosyntropin (synthetic ACTH) or cosyntropin that had been reconstituted and stored frozen at −20 C in plastic syringes for 2, 4, and 6 months. Cosyntropin was administered at 5 μg/kg (2.3 μg/lb) of body weight, IV.

Results

Baseline serum cortisol concentrations were similar at each sampling time. Compared with the effects of freshly reconstituted cosyntropin, administration of cosyntropin that had been frozen did not have a significantly different effect on serum cortisol concentrations.

Clinical lmplications

Cosyntropin can be reconstituted and stored frozen at −20 C in plastic syringes for 6 months with no adverse effects on bioactivity of the polypeptide. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998;212: 1569–1571)

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 369 369 78
PDF Downloads 127 127 32
Advertisement