Use of age and serum ɣ-glutamyltransferase activity to assess passive transfer status in lambs

Ronald K. Tessman From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-7010.

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Jeff W. Tyler From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-7010.

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Steven M. Parish From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-7010.

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Dennis L. Johnson From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-7010.

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Roderick G. Gant From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-7010.

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Helen A. Grasseschi From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-7010.

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Objective

To develop an algorithm for predicting passive transfer status of lambs of various ages, using the lamb's age and serum ɣ-glutamyltransferase (GGT) activity.

Design

Prospective study.

Animals

51 Suffolk, Columbia, and crossbred lambs from 1 to 16 days old.

Procedure

Serum was obtained from all lambs. Serum GGT activity was measured, using a commercially available kit. Serum IgG concentration was determined by use of radial immunodiffusion. Day-1 serum IgG concentration was estimated from sample IgG concentration, lamb age, and the published 14-day half-life of IgG in lambs. Stepwise multivariate regression models were developed to estimate day-1 serum IgG concentration as a function of the natural logarithm of serum GGT activity (In[GGT]) and natural logarithm of lamb age (In[age]) at the time of sampling. These regression models were then used to calculate serum GGT activities that were equivalent to various day-1 IgG concentrations in lambs of various ages.

Results

In(GGT) and In(age) were significantly associated with estimated day-1 IgG concentration. Day-1 serum IgG concentration could be predicted using the formula: IgG = −7,686 + 1,366(In[GGT]) + 1,199(In[age]). The model was moderately accurate in predicting serum IgG concentration (R 2 = 0.52).

Clinical Implications

Serum GGT activity can be used to assess passive transfer status of lambs. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1997;211:1163–1164)

Objective

To develop an algorithm for predicting passive transfer status of lambs of various ages, using the lamb's age and serum ɣ-glutamyltransferase (GGT) activity.

Design

Prospective study.

Animals

51 Suffolk, Columbia, and crossbred lambs from 1 to 16 days old.

Procedure

Serum was obtained from all lambs. Serum GGT activity was measured, using a commercially available kit. Serum IgG concentration was determined by use of radial immunodiffusion. Day-1 serum IgG concentration was estimated from sample IgG concentration, lamb age, and the published 14-day half-life of IgG in lambs. Stepwise multivariate regression models were developed to estimate day-1 serum IgG concentration as a function of the natural logarithm of serum GGT activity (In[GGT]) and natural logarithm of lamb age (In[age]) at the time of sampling. These regression models were then used to calculate serum GGT activities that were equivalent to various day-1 IgG concentrations in lambs of various ages.

Results

In(GGT) and In(age) were significantly associated with estimated day-1 IgG concentration. Day-1 serum IgG concentration could be predicted using the formula: IgG = −7,686 + 1,366(In[GGT]) + 1,199(In[age]). The model was moderately accurate in predicting serum IgG concentration (R 2 = 0.52).

Clinical Implications

Serum GGT activity can be used to assess passive transfer status of lambs. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1997;211:1163–1164)

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