Neurologic examination of sea turtles

Cheryl L. Chrisman From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610-0125 (Chrisman, Zurawka); Sea World, 7007 Sea World Dr, Orlando, FL 32821 (Walsh); Department of Companion Animal and Special Species Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606 (Meeks); Texas Diagnostic Laboratory, 1103 Winecup Ct, College Station, TX 77845 (LaRock); Institute for Animal Studies, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461 (Herbst); and Department of Comparative Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37901 (Schumacher).

Search for other papers by Cheryl L. Chrisman in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MS, EdS
,
Michael Walsh From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610-0125 (Chrisman, Zurawka); Sea World, 7007 Sea World Dr, Orlando, FL 32821 (Walsh); Department of Companion Animal and Special Species Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606 (Meeks); Texas Diagnostic Laboratory, 1103 Winecup Ct, College Station, TX 77845 (LaRock); Institute for Animal Studies, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461 (Herbst); and Department of Comparative Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37901 (Schumacher).

Search for other papers by Michael Walsh in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
,
John C. Meeks From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610-0125 (Chrisman, Zurawka); Sea World, 7007 Sea World Dr, Orlando, FL 32821 (Walsh); Department of Companion Animal and Special Species Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606 (Meeks); Texas Diagnostic Laboratory, 1103 Winecup Ct, College Station, TX 77845 (LaRock); Institute for Animal Studies, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461 (Herbst); and Department of Comparative Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37901 (Schumacher).

Search for other papers by John C. Meeks in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
,
Heidi Zurawka From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610-0125 (Chrisman, Zurawka); Sea World, 7007 Sea World Dr, Orlando, FL 32821 (Walsh); Department of Companion Animal and Special Species Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606 (Meeks); Texas Diagnostic Laboratory, 1103 Winecup Ct, College Station, TX 77845 (LaRock); Institute for Animal Studies, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461 (Herbst); and Department of Comparative Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37901 (Schumacher).

Search for other papers by Heidi Zurawka in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
,
Richard LaRock From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610-0125 (Chrisman, Zurawka); Sea World, 7007 Sea World Dr, Orlando, FL 32821 (Walsh); Department of Companion Animal and Special Species Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606 (Meeks); Texas Diagnostic Laboratory, 1103 Winecup Ct, College Station, TX 77845 (LaRock); Institute for Animal Studies, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461 (Herbst); and Department of Comparative Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37901 (Schumacher).

Search for other papers by Richard LaRock in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
,
Larry Herbst From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610-0125 (Chrisman, Zurawka); Sea World, 7007 Sea World Dr, Orlando, FL 32821 (Walsh); Department of Companion Animal and Special Species Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606 (Meeks); Texas Diagnostic Laboratory, 1103 Winecup Ct, College Station, TX 77845 (LaRock); Institute for Animal Studies, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461 (Herbst); and Department of Comparative Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37901 (Schumacher).

Search for other papers by Larry Herbst in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD
, and
Juergen Schumacher From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610-0125 (Chrisman, Zurawka); Sea World, 7007 Sea World Dr, Orlando, FL 32821 (Walsh); Department of Companion Animal and Special Species Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606 (Meeks); Texas Diagnostic Laboratory, 1103 Winecup Ct, College Station, TX 77845 (LaRock); Institute for Animal Studies, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461 (Herbst); and Department of Comparative Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37901 (Schumacher).

Search for other papers by Juergen Schumacher in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 Dr Med Vet

Click on author name to view affiliation information

Objective

To determine whether neurologic examination techniques established for use on dogs and cats could be adapted for use on sea turtles.

Design

Prospective controlled observational study.

Animals

4 healthy Green Turtles (Chelonia mydas), 1 healthy Kemp's ridley sea turtle (Lepidochelys kempi), and 6 Green Turtles suspected to have neurologic abnormalities.

Procedure

Neurologic examinations were performed while sea turtles were in and out of the water and in ventral and dorsal recumbency. Mentation, general activity, head and body posture, movement and coordination, thoracic and pelvic limb movement, strength and muscle tone, and tail movement were observed. Thoracic and pelvic limb flexor reflexes and nociception, righting response, cranial nerve reflexes, clasp and cloacal reflexes, and neck, dorsal scute, cloacal, and tail nociception were tested.

Results

Results of neurologic evaluations were consistent for healthy sea turtles. Sea turtles suspected to have neurologic abnormalities had abnormal results.

Clinical Implications

Many of the neurologic examination techniques used to evaluate dogs and cats can be adapted and used to evaluate sea turtles. A standardized neurologic examination should result in an accurate assessment of neurologic function in impaired sea turtles and should help in evaluating effects of rehabilitation efforts and suitability for return to their natural environment. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1997;211:1043–1047)

Objective

To determine whether neurologic examination techniques established for use on dogs and cats could be adapted for use on sea turtles.

Design

Prospective controlled observational study.

Animals

4 healthy Green Turtles (Chelonia mydas), 1 healthy Kemp's ridley sea turtle (Lepidochelys kempi), and 6 Green Turtles suspected to have neurologic abnormalities.

Procedure

Neurologic examinations were performed while sea turtles were in and out of the water and in ventral and dorsal recumbency. Mentation, general activity, head and body posture, movement and coordination, thoracic and pelvic limb movement, strength and muscle tone, and tail movement were observed. Thoracic and pelvic limb flexor reflexes and nociception, righting response, cranial nerve reflexes, clasp and cloacal reflexes, and neck, dorsal scute, cloacal, and tail nociception were tested.

Results

Results of neurologic evaluations were consistent for healthy sea turtles. Sea turtles suspected to have neurologic abnormalities had abnormal results.

Clinical Implications

Many of the neurologic examination techniques used to evaluate dogs and cats can be adapted and used to evaluate sea turtles. A standardized neurologic examination should result in an accurate assessment of neurologic function in impaired sea turtles and should help in evaluating effects of rehabilitation efforts and suitability for return to their natural environment. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1997;211:1043–1047)

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 437 437 187
PDF Downloads 64 64 18
Advertisement