Glycosylated hemoglobin concentrations in the blood of healthy dogs and dogs with naturally developing diabetes mellitus, pancreatic β-cell neoplasia, hyperadrenocorticism, and anemia

Denise A. Elliott From the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (Elliott) and Department of Medicine and Epidemiology (Nelson, Feldman, Neal), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

Search for other papers by Denise A. Elliott in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 BVSc
,
Richard W. Nelson From the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (Elliott) and Department of Medicine and Epidemiology (Nelson, Feldman, Neal), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

Search for other papers by Richard W. Nelson in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
,
Edward C. Feldman From the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (Elliott) and Department of Medicine and Epidemiology (Nelson, Feldman, Neal), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

Search for other papers by Edward C. Feldman in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
, and
Larry A. Neal From the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (Elliott) and Department of Medicine and Epidemiology (Nelson, Feldman, Neal), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

Search for other papers by Larry A. Neal in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 BS

Click on author name to view affiliation information

Objective

To characterize glycosylated hemoglobin (GHb) concentrations in the blood of dogs with disorders that may affect serum glucose or blood GHb concentrations, and to determine whether changes in GHb concentration correlate with changes in control of diabetes in dogs.

Design

Prospective study.

Animals

63 healthy dogs, 9 dogs with anemia, 24 dogs with untreated hyperadrenocorticism, 12 dogs with pancreatic β-cell neoplasia, 23 dogs with newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus, and 77 diabetic dogs treated with insulin.

Procedure

Control of diabetes in dogs treated with insulin was classified as good or poor on the basis of history, physical examination findings, changes in body weight, and measurement of serum glucose concentrations. Sequential evaluations of control were performed and GHb concentration in blood was measured, by means of affinity chromatography, for 5 untreated diabetic dogs before and after initiating insulin treatment, for 10 poorly controlled diabetic dogs before and after increasing insulin dosage, and for 5 diabetic dogs before and after pancreatic islet cell transplantation.

Results

Mean (± SD) GHb concentration was 3.3 ± 0.8% in the blood of healthy dogs. Compared with results from healthy dogs, mean GHb concentration was significantly lower in the blood of dogs with anemia and pancreatic β-cell neoplasia and significantly higher in the blood of untreated diabetic dogs. Mean GHb concentration was significantly higher in the blood of 46 poorly controlled diabetic dogs, compared with 31 well-controlled diabetic dogs (7.3 ± 1.8 vs 5.7 ± 1.7%, respectively). Mean GHb concentration in blood decreased significantly in 5 untreated diabetic dogs after treatment (8.7 ± 1.9 vs 5.3 ± 1.9%). Mean GHb concentration in blood also decreased significantly in 10 poorly controlled diabetic dogs after control was improved and in 5 diabetic dogs after they had received a pancreatic islet cell transplant.

Clinical Implications

Measurement of GHb concentration in blood may assist in monitoring control of diabetes in dogs. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1997; 211:723–727)

Objective

To characterize glycosylated hemoglobin (GHb) concentrations in the blood of dogs with disorders that may affect serum glucose or blood GHb concentrations, and to determine whether changes in GHb concentration correlate with changes in control of diabetes in dogs.

Design

Prospective study.

Animals

63 healthy dogs, 9 dogs with anemia, 24 dogs with untreated hyperadrenocorticism, 12 dogs with pancreatic β-cell neoplasia, 23 dogs with newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus, and 77 diabetic dogs treated with insulin.

Procedure

Control of diabetes in dogs treated with insulin was classified as good or poor on the basis of history, physical examination findings, changes in body weight, and measurement of serum glucose concentrations. Sequential evaluations of control were performed and GHb concentration in blood was measured, by means of affinity chromatography, for 5 untreated diabetic dogs before and after initiating insulin treatment, for 10 poorly controlled diabetic dogs before and after increasing insulin dosage, and for 5 diabetic dogs before and after pancreatic islet cell transplantation.

Results

Mean (± SD) GHb concentration was 3.3 ± 0.8% in the blood of healthy dogs. Compared with results from healthy dogs, mean GHb concentration was significantly lower in the blood of dogs with anemia and pancreatic β-cell neoplasia and significantly higher in the blood of untreated diabetic dogs. Mean GHb concentration was significantly higher in the blood of 46 poorly controlled diabetic dogs, compared with 31 well-controlled diabetic dogs (7.3 ± 1.8 vs 5.7 ± 1.7%, respectively). Mean GHb concentration in blood decreased significantly in 5 untreated diabetic dogs after treatment (8.7 ± 1.9 vs 5.3 ± 1.9%). Mean GHb concentration in blood also decreased significantly in 10 poorly controlled diabetic dogs after control was improved and in 5 diabetic dogs after they had received a pancreatic islet cell transplant.

Clinical Implications

Measurement of GHb concentration in blood may assist in monitoring control of diabetes in dogs. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1997; 211:723–727)

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 313 313 88
PDF Downloads 33 33 5
Advertisement