Surgical and nonsurgical correction of uterine torsion in New World camelids: 20 cases (1990–1996)

Christopher K. Cebra From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

Search for other papers by Christopher K. Cebra in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 VMD, MS
,
Margaret L. Cebra From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

Search for other papers by Margaret L. Cebra in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 VMD, MS
,
Franklyn B. Garry From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

Search for other papers by Franklyn B. Garry in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MS
, and
LaRue W. Johnson From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

Search for other papers by LaRue W. Johnson in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD

Click on author name to view affiliation information

Objective

To report clinical findings for New World camelids with uterine torsion and to compare results of 3 methods of correction.

Design

Retrospective case series.

Animals

11 llamas and 3 alpacas with 20 uterine torsions.

Procedure

Information concerning history, clinical signs, management, and postpartum complications was retrieved from medical records. Information concerning subsequent reproductive performance was obtained by telephone interview of owners.

Results

Uterine torsion was corrected by celiotomy (n = 7), transvaginal manipulation (5), or rolling the dam (8). Direction of 19 of 20 torsions was clockwise when viewed from the rear. Retention of fetal membranes was reported for 5 camelids that underwent celiotomy, but was not reported in camelids after nonsurgical correction. The uterus prolapsed in 1 llama that underwent celiotomy and in another that underwent the rolling technique. Although 2 camelids that underwent celiotomy subsequently failed to conceive, all camelids treated by nonsurgical techniques conceived.

Clinical Implications

Uterine torsion in camelids may be diagnosed by methods similar to those used in cattle. Surgical and nonsurgical methods can be used to correct torsion, and postpartum complications are rare when torsion is corrected by a nonsurgical method. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1997;211:600–602)

Objective

To report clinical findings for New World camelids with uterine torsion and to compare results of 3 methods of correction.

Design

Retrospective case series.

Animals

11 llamas and 3 alpacas with 20 uterine torsions.

Procedure

Information concerning history, clinical signs, management, and postpartum complications was retrieved from medical records. Information concerning subsequent reproductive performance was obtained by telephone interview of owners.

Results

Uterine torsion was corrected by celiotomy (n = 7), transvaginal manipulation (5), or rolling the dam (8). Direction of 19 of 20 torsions was clockwise when viewed from the rear. Retention of fetal membranes was reported for 5 camelids that underwent celiotomy, but was not reported in camelids after nonsurgical correction. The uterus prolapsed in 1 llama that underwent celiotomy and in another that underwent the rolling technique. Although 2 camelids that underwent celiotomy subsequently failed to conceive, all camelids treated by nonsurgical techniques conceived.

Clinical Implications

Uterine torsion in camelids may be diagnosed by methods similar to those used in cattle. Surgical and nonsurgical methods can be used to correct torsion, and postpartum complications are rare when torsion is corrected by a nonsurgical method. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1997;211:600–602)

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 272 272 80
PDF Downloads 42 42 4
Advertisement