Risk of shedding Salmonella organisms by market-age hogs in a barn with open-flush gutters

Peter R. Davies From the Departments of Food Animal and Equine Medicine (Davies, Deen), Animal Science (Morrow), and Poultry Science (Jones), College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606, and Enteric Diseases Research Unit, National Animal Disease Center, Ames, IA 50010 (Fedorka-Cray, Gray).

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W E. Morgan Morrow From the Departments of Food Animal and Equine Medicine (Davies, Deen), Animal Science (Morrow), and Poultry Science (Jones), College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606, and Enteric Diseases Research Unit, National Animal Disease Center, Ames, IA 50010 (Fedorka-Cray, Gray).

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Frank T. Jones From the Departments of Food Animal and Equine Medicine (Davies, Deen), Animal Science (Morrow), and Poultry Science (Jones), College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606, and Enteric Diseases Research Unit, National Animal Disease Center, Ames, IA 50010 (Fedorka-Cray, Gray).

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John Deen From the Departments of Food Animal and Equine Medicine (Davies, Deen), Animal Science (Morrow), and Poultry Science (Jones), College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606, and Enteric Diseases Research Unit, National Animal Disease Center, Ames, IA 50010 (Fedorka-Cray, Gray).

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Paula J. Fedorka-Cray From the Departments of Food Animal and Equine Medicine (Davies, Deen), Animal Science (Morrow), and Poultry Science (Jones), College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606, and Enteric Diseases Research Unit, National Animal Disease Center, Ames, IA 50010 (Fedorka-Cray, Gray).

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Jeffrey T. Gray From the Departments of Food Animal and Equine Medicine (Davies, Deen), Animal Science (Morrow), and Poultry Science (Jones), College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606, and Enteric Diseases Research Unit, National Animal Disease Center, Ames, IA 50010 (Fedorka-Cray, Gray).

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Objective

To compare prevalence of fecal shedding of Salmonella organisms and serum antibodies to Salmonella sp in market-age pigs housed in barns with partially slotted floors or solid floors with openflush gutters.

Design

Cross-sectional study of prevalence.

Sample Population

Finishing-age pigs deemed by the producer to be within 1 month of slaughter.

Procedure

Fecal and serum samples were obtained from a group of 121 pigs housed in a barn with solid floors (31 fecal samples, 30 serum samples) and from a group of about 400 pigs housed on partially slotted floors (57 fecal samples, 64 serum samples). Fecal samples were submitted for bacteriologic culture to detect Salmonella organisms, and serum samples were tested for antibodies by use of ELISA.

Results

Salmonella agona was isolated from 26 of 31 (84%) fecal samples obtained from pigs housed in the open-flush gutter barn, compared with 5 of 57 (9%) fecal samples from pigs in the barn with slotted floors. Median value for optical density was higher for serum samples from pigs housed in the openflush gutter barn.

Clinical Implications

Housing of finishing-age swine in barns with open-flush gutters may contribute to increased shedding of Salmonella sp. Analysis of our observations indicated that repeated exposure to infected feces is important in prolonging fecal shedding by swine. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1997;210:386–389

Objective

To compare prevalence of fecal shedding of Salmonella organisms and serum antibodies to Salmonella sp in market-age pigs housed in barns with partially slotted floors or solid floors with openflush gutters.

Design

Cross-sectional study of prevalence.

Sample Population

Finishing-age pigs deemed by the producer to be within 1 month of slaughter.

Procedure

Fecal and serum samples were obtained from a group of 121 pigs housed in a barn with solid floors (31 fecal samples, 30 serum samples) and from a group of about 400 pigs housed on partially slotted floors (57 fecal samples, 64 serum samples). Fecal samples were submitted for bacteriologic culture to detect Salmonella organisms, and serum samples were tested for antibodies by use of ELISA.

Results

Salmonella agona was isolated from 26 of 31 (84%) fecal samples obtained from pigs housed in the open-flush gutter barn, compared with 5 of 57 (9%) fecal samples from pigs in the barn with slotted floors. Median value for optical density was higher for serum samples from pigs housed in the openflush gutter barn.

Clinical Implications

Housing of finishing-age swine in barns with open-flush gutters may contribute to increased shedding of Salmonella sp. Analysis of our observations indicated that repeated exposure to infected feces is important in prolonging fecal shedding by swine. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1997;210:386–389

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