Effect of racing on serum sodium and potassium concentrations and acid-base status of Alaskan sled dogs

Kenneth W. Hinchcliff From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University. Columbus, OH 432l0-1089 (Hinchcliff); Research and Development, The lams Co, PO Box 189, Lewisburg, OH 45338 (Reinhart, Burr, Schreier); and Lightning Bolt Express Kennels, PO Box 16205, Two Rivers, AK 99716 (Swenson).

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Gregory A. Reinhart From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University. Columbus, OH 432l0-1089 (Hinchcliff); Research and Development, The lams Co, PO Box 189, Lewisburg, OH 45338 (Reinhart, Burr, Schreier); and Lightning Bolt Express Kennels, PO Box 16205, Two Rivers, AK 99716 (Swenson).

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John R. Burr From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University. Columbus, OH 432l0-1089 (Hinchcliff); Research and Development, The lams Co, PO Box 189, Lewisburg, OH 45338 (Reinhart, Burr, Schreier); and Lightning Bolt Express Kennels, PO Box 16205, Two Rivers, AK 99716 (Swenson).

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Curt J. Schreier From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University. Columbus, OH 432l0-1089 (Hinchcliff); Research and Development, The lams Co, PO Box 189, Lewisburg, OH 45338 (Reinhart, Burr, Schreier); and Lightning Bolt Express Kennels, PO Box 16205, Two Rivers, AK 99716 (Swenson).

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Richard A. Swenson From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University. Columbus, OH 432l0-1089 (Hinchcliff); Research and Development, The lams Co, PO Box 189, Lewisburg, OH 45338 (Reinhart, Burr, Schreier); and Lightning Bolt Express Kennels, PO Box 16205, Two Rivers, AK 99716 (Swenson).

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Objective—

To examine the effect of participation in a long-distance race on serum electrolyte concentrations, estimated exchangeable cation content, and acid-base status of Alaskan sled dogs.

Design—

Prospective study.

Animals—

9 male and 5 female, sexually intact, physically fit Alaskan sled dogs between 18 and 48 months old.

Procedure—

Body weight was recorded, and blood samples were collected from dogs before, during, and after a 300-mile race.

Results—

Serum sodium and potassium concentrations decreased during the race, as did serum total protein, albumin, and globulin concentrations and PCV. Effects on acid-base status were minimal. Body weight and estimated total exchangeable cation content in dogs also decreased significantly during the race.

Clinical Implications—

Prolonged running is associated with decreases in serum cation concentration and estimated total exchangeable cation content in dogs, as in human beings and horses. However, the mechanism of the decrease in serum cation concentration likely differs among species. Clinical abnormalities associated with cation depletion were not observed in the dogs in this study. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1997;210: 1615–1618)

Objective—

To examine the effect of participation in a long-distance race on serum electrolyte concentrations, estimated exchangeable cation content, and acid-base status of Alaskan sled dogs.

Design—

Prospective study.

Animals—

9 male and 5 female, sexually intact, physically fit Alaskan sled dogs between 18 and 48 months old.

Procedure—

Body weight was recorded, and blood samples were collected from dogs before, during, and after a 300-mile race.

Results—

Serum sodium and potassium concentrations decreased during the race, as did serum total protein, albumin, and globulin concentrations and PCV. Effects on acid-base status were minimal. Body weight and estimated total exchangeable cation content in dogs also decreased significantly during the race.

Clinical Implications—

Prolonged running is associated with decreases in serum cation concentration and estimated total exchangeable cation content in dogs, as in human beings and horses. However, the mechanism of the decrease in serum cation concentration likely differs among species. Clinical abnormalities associated with cation depletion were not observed in the dogs in this study. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1997;210: 1615–1618)

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