Tooth root abscesses in New World camelids: 23 cases (1972-1994)

Margaret L. Cebra From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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 VMD, MS
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Christopher K. Cebra From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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Franklyn B. Garry From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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 DVM, MS

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Objective

To determine typical clinical and radiographic findings in a group of New World camelids with tooth root abscesses and to determine outcome after medical and surgical treatment.

Design

Retrospective case series.

Animals

23 llamas and alpacas with radiographic and clinical evidence of tooth root abscesses.

Procedure

Disease history, signalment, physical and radiographic examination findings, bacteriologic culture results, treatment, and short-term and long-term outcome were retrieved from the medical records.

Results

Local swelling was the most common clinical abnormality in camelids with tooth root abscesses. Mandibular molars were affected most commonly, and bacteriologic culture of samples from lesions often revealed facultative anaerobic bacteria. Antibiotic treatment for at least 30 days, surgical extraction of the affected tooth, and a root canal procedure were used successfully to treat tooth root abscesses.

Clinical Implications

Both surgical and medical treatment of tooth root abscesses may lead to successful resolution of clinical signs in New World camelids. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1996;209:819–822)

Objective

To determine typical clinical and radiographic findings in a group of New World camelids with tooth root abscesses and to determine outcome after medical and surgical treatment.

Design

Retrospective case series.

Animals

23 llamas and alpacas with radiographic and clinical evidence of tooth root abscesses.

Procedure

Disease history, signalment, physical and radiographic examination findings, bacteriologic culture results, treatment, and short-term and long-term outcome were retrieved from the medical records.

Results

Local swelling was the most common clinical abnormality in camelids with tooth root abscesses. Mandibular molars were affected most commonly, and bacteriologic culture of samples from lesions often revealed facultative anaerobic bacteria. Antibiotic treatment for at least 30 days, surgical extraction of the affected tooth, and a root canal procedure were used successfully to treat tooth root abscesses.

Clinical Implications

Both surgical and medical treatment of tooth root abscesses may lead to successful resolution of clinical signs in New World camelids. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1996;209:819–822)

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