Surgical treatment of tracheal collapse in dogs: 90 cases (1983-1993)

Janice L. Buback From the Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843.

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Harry W. Boothe From the Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843.

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H. Phil Hobson From the Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843.

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Objective—

To determine factors associated with long-term outcome in dogs with tracheal collapse treated with extraluminal polypropylene C-shaped stents.

Design—

Retrospective case series.

Animals—

90 dogs.

Procedure—

Medical records of dogs with surgically treated tracheal collapse were reviewed. Follow-up was obtained either by recheck at the veterinary teaching hospital only (n = 10) or by telephone interviews with referring veterinarians and owners (n = 35), referring veterinarians alone (n = 23), or owners alone (n = 16). The χ2 test was used to determine which factors were associated with long-term outcome.

Results—

11 breeds were represented. Yorkshire Terriers, Poodles, and Pomeranians were most common. Median age at the time of surgery was 6.8 years. Median weight was 2.9 kg. Severity of collapse ranged from grade II to grade IV. Dogs < 6 years old had more severe collapse than did dogs ≥ 6 years old. Dogs ≥ 6 years old had more postoperative complications and a poorer long-term outcome than did dogs < 6 years old. 17 dogs required permanent tracheostomy, 10 within 24 hours after surgery.

Clinical Implications—

Surgical placement of extraluminal polypropylene C-shaped stents was an effective method of attenuating clinical signs of tracheal collapse. Dogs < 6 years old had more severe tracheal collapse but did better after surgery than did dogs ≥ 6 years old. U Am Vet Med Assoc 1996;208:380-384)

Objective—

To determine factors associated with long-term outcome in dogs with tracheal collapse treated with extraluminal polypropylene C-shaped stents.

Design—

Retrospective case series.

Animals—

90 dogs.

Procedure—

Medical records of dogs with surgically treated tracheal collapse were reviewed. Follow-up was obtained either by recheck at the veterinary teaching hospital only (n = 10) or by telephone interviews with referring veterinarians and owners (n = 35), referring veterinarians alone (n = 23), or owners alone (n = 16). The χ2 test was used to determine which factors were associated with long-term outcome.

Results—

11 breeds were represented. Yorkshire Terriers, Poodles, and Pomeranians were most common. Median age at the time of surgery was 6.8 years. Median weight was 2.9 kg. Severity of collapse ranged from grade II to grade IV. Dogs < 6 years old had more severe collapse than did dogs ≥ 6 years old. Dogs ≥ 6 years old had more postoperative complications and a poorer long-term outcome than did dogs < 6 years old. 17 dogs required permanent tracheostomy, 10 within 24 hours after surgery.

Clinical Implications—

Surgical placement of extraluminal polypropylene C-shaped stents was an effective method of attenuating clinical signs of tracheal collapse. Dogs < 6 years old had more severe tracheal collapse but did better after surgery than did dogs ≥ 6 years old. U Am Vet Med Assoc 1996;208:380-384)

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