Comparison of two techniques for castration of llamas

A. N. Baird From the Department of Large Animal Surgery and Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849-5522.

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D. G. Pugh From the Department of Large Animal Surgery and Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849-5522.

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J. G. W. Wenzel From the Department of Large Animal Surgery and Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849-5522.

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H. C. Lin From the Department of Large Animal Surgery and Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849-5522.

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Objective—

To compare a prescrotal castration technique with the conventional bilateral scrotal incision technique for castration of llamas.

Design—

Prospective randomized controlled trial.

Animals—

10 clinically normal, sexually intact male llamas.

Procedure—

Five llamas were castrated by use of a 5-cm skin incision located 2 to 3 cm lateral to the ventral midline and approximately 15 cm cranial to the scrotum, which was closed with absorbable suture material to allow primary healing. Five other llamas were castrated via a more conventional technique, with a 5-cm scrotal incision positioned directly over each testis, which was allowed to heal by second intention.

Results—

The prescrotal technique required significantly more time to complete; however, no additional anesthesia was required to complete the longer procedure. Llamas castrated with the prescrotal technique required less aftercare and had less incisional pain when the area was palpated.

Clinical Implications—

Both techniques are safe and effective. Some clients, however, find the prescrotal technique more aesthetically acceptable. The prescrotal technique may be more clinically important where fly control is difficult. U Am Vet Med Assoc 1996:208:261-262)

Objective—

To compare a prescrotal castration technique with the conventional bilateral scrotal incision technique for castration of llamas.

Design—

Prospective randomized controlled trial.

Animals—

10 clinically normal, sexually intact male llamas.

Procedure—

Five llamas were castrated by use of a 5-cm skin incision located 2 to 3 cm lateral to the ventral midline and approximately 15 cm cranial to the scrotum, which was closed with absorbable suture material to allow primary healing. Five other llamas were castrated via a more conventional technique, with a 5-cm scrotal incision positioned directly over each testis, which was allowed to heal by second intention.

Results—

The prescrotal technique required significantly more time to complete; however, no additional anesthesia was required to complete the longer procedure. Llamas castrated with the prescrotal technique required less aftercare and had less incisional pain when the area was palpated.

Clinical Implications—

Both techniques are safe and effective. Some clients, however, find the prescrotal technique more aesthetically acceptable. The prescrotal technique may be more clinically important where fly control is difficult. U Am Vet Med Assoc 1996:208:261-262)

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