Use of a modified toggle pin for repair of coxofemoral luxation in dogs with multiple orthopedic injuries: 14 cases (1986-1994)

Huey P. Beckham Jr. From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA, 24060 (Beckham, Smith); and the Veterinary Surgery Service, 1381 Tennessee Ave, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (Kern).

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Mark M. Smith From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA, 24060 (Beckham, Smith); and the Veterinary Surgery Service, 1381 Tennessee Ave, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (Kern).

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Douglas A. Kern From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA, 24060 (Beckham, Smith); and the Veterinary Surgery Service, 1381 Tennessee Ave, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (Kern).

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Objective

To develop modifications of the toggle pin procedure for use as a ligament of the head of the femur (LHF) prosthesis and to assess outcomes when used for coxofemoral luxation (CFL) in dogs with multiple orthopedic injuries.

Design

Retrospective case series.

Sample Population

14 dogs with CFL as a component of orthopedic polytrauma.

Procedure

Modifications to previous descriptions of the technique for use of a toggle pin for LHF prosthesis included deletion of the osteotomy of the greater trochanter in 12 of 16 joints with CFL, drilling of the femoral tunnel from a distal-to-proximal direction, deletion of a second femoral bone tunnel for suture placement, and use of a 2-hole polypropylene button to secure the LHF prosthetic suture.

Results

Mean age at time of injury, weight, and duration between injury and definitive surgery was 4.1 ± 1.1 years, 19.7 ± 2.8 kg, and 5.8 ± 2.7 days, respectively. Weightbearing began 3.0 ± 0.4 days after surgery. Mean postoperative follow-up period for dogs with maintained coxofemoral reduction of longer than 1 month (n = 13) was 19.5 ± 6.1 months. Owners reported good or excellent clinical results, which were confirmed by semi-quantitative assessment methods. Radiographic signs of degenerative joint disease were minimal. There was no significant difference between hind limbs when comparing mid-thigh limb circumference at the time of follow-up examination.

Clinical Implications

A modified toggle pin procedure for LHF prosthesis can maintain coxofemoral reduction and allow early weightbearing in dogs with coxofemoral luxation as a component of multiple orthopedic injuries.

Objective

To develop modifications of the toggle pin procedure for use as a ligament of the head of the femur (LHF) prosthesis and to assess outcomes when used for coxofemoral luxation (CFL) in dogs with multiple orthopedic injuries.

Design

Retrospective case series.

Sample Population

14 dogs with CFL as a component of orthopedic polytrauma.

Procedure

Modifications to previous descriptions of the technique for use of a toggle pin for LHF prosthesis included deletion of the osteotomy of the greater trochanter in 12 of 16 joints with CFL, drilling of the femoral tunnel from a distal-to-proximal direction, deletion of a second femoral bone tunnel for suture placement, and use of a 2-hole polypropylene button to secure the LHF prosthetic suture.

Results

Mean age at time of injury, weight, and duration between injury and definitive surgery was 4.1 ± 1.1 years, 19.7 ± 2.8 kg, and 5.8 ± 2.7 days, respectively. Weightbearing began 3.0 ± 0.4 days after surgery. Mean postoperative follow-up period for dogs with maintained coxofemoral reduction of longer than 1 month (n = 13) was 19.5 ± 6.1 months. Owners reported good or excellent clinical results, which were confirmed by semi-quantitative assessment methods. Radiographic signs of degenerative joint disease were minimal. There was no significant difference between hind limbs when comparing mid-thigh limb circumference at the time of follow-up examination.

Clinical Implications

A modified toggle pin procedure for LHF prosthesis can maintain coxofemoral reduction and allow early weightbearing in dogs with coxofemoral luxation as a component of multiple orthopedic injuries.

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