Laparoscopic surgical approach and anatomy of the abdomen in llamas

David E. Anderson From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (Anderson, Gaughan) and the Department of Large Animal Surgery and Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849 (Baird, Lin, Pugh).

Search for other papers by David E. Anderson in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MS
,
Earl M. Gaughan From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (Anderson, Gaughan) and the Department of Large Animal Surgery and Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849 (Baird, Lin, Pugh).

Search for other papers by Earl M. Gaughan in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
,
A. N. Baird From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (Anderson, Gaughan) and the Department of Large Animal Surgery and Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849 (Baird, Lin, Pugh).

Search for other papers by A. N. Baird in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MS
,
Hui-Chu Lin From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (Anderson, Gaughan) and the Department of Large Animal Surgery and Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849 (Baird, Lin, Pugh).

Search for other papers by Hui-Chu Lin in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MS
, and
D. G. Pugh From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (Anderson, Gaughan) and the Department of Large Animal Surgery and Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849 (Baird, Lin, Pugh).

Search for other papers by D. G. Pugh in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MS

Click on author name to view affiliation information

Objective

To describe 3 laparoscopic approaches for, and the normal laparoscopic anatomy of, the abdomen in adult llamas and to evaluate the effects of laparoscopy in those llamas.

Design

Prospective clinical trial.

Animals

Six adult castrated male llamas.

Procedure

After induction of general anesthesia, 3 surgical approaches to the abdomen were performed: left paralumbar, ventral midline, and right paralumbar. The abdomen was systematically examined, and anatomic features described. After recovery from anesthesia, all llamas were examined daily for 10 days and CBC was repeated 24, 72, and 120 hours after laparoscopy.

Results

Laparoscopy was successfully performed in all llamas by use of the ventral midline and right paralumbar approaches. The laparoscope was inadvertently placed into the left retroperitoneal space in 1 of the 6 llamas when the left paralumbar approach was used. Also, hemorrhage into the abdomen limited the view from the left side in another llama. Various approaches allowed viewing of the first and third forestomach compartments, liver, spleen, kidneys, small intestine, ileum, proximal loop of the ascending colon, spiral colon, and urinary bladder. Postoperative findings included subcutaneous emphysema and edema. Mean WBC count peaked 24 hours after surgery (mean, 23,500 cells/μl). Generally, neutrophil count increased and lymphocyte count decreased during the 120 hours after surgery.

Clinical Implications

Laparoscopy may be used for differentiation of medical and surgical lesions in the abdomen of llamas. The site for laparoscopy should be chosen on the basis of the most likely site of the suspected lesion.

Objective

To describe 3 laparoscopic approaches for, and the normal laparoscopic anatomy of, the abdomen in adult llamas and to evaluate the effects of laparoscopy in those llamas.

Design

Prospective clinical trial.

Animals

Six adult castrated male llamas.

Procedure

After induction of general anesthesia, 3 surgical approaches to the abdomen were performed: left paralumbar, ventral midline, and right paralumbar. The abdomen was systematically examined, and anatomic features described. After recovery from anesthesia, all llamas were examined daily for 10 days and CBC was repeated 24, 72, and 120 hours after laparoscopy.

Results

Laparoscopy was successfully performed in all llamas by use of the ventral midline and right paralumbar approaches. The laparoscope was inadvertently placed into the left retroperitoneal space in 1 of the 6 llamas when the left paralumbar approach was used. Also, hemorrhage into the abdomen limited the view from the left side in another llama. Various approaches allowed viewing of the first and third forestomach compartments, liver, spleen, kidneys, small intestine, ileum, proximal loop of the ascending colon, spiral colon, and urinary bladder. Postoperative findings included subcutaneous emphysema and edema. Mean WBC count peaked 24 hours after surgery (mean, 23,500 cells/μl). Generally, neutrophil count increased and lymphocyte count decreased during the 120 hours after surgery.

Clinical Implications

Laparoscopy may be used for differentiation of medical and surgical lesions in the abdomen of llamas. The site for laparoscopy should be chosen on the basis of the most likely site of the suspected lesion.

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 373 373 150
PDF Downloads 32 32 7
Advertisement