Endoscopic and surgical retrieval of fishhooks from the stomach and esophagus in dogs and cats: 75 cases (1977-1993)

Gina Μ. Michels From the Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine (Michels, Jones, Huss), and the Division of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, School of Medicine (Wagner-Mann), University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.

Search for other papers by Gina Μ. Michels in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
,
Brent D. Jones From the Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine (Michels, Jones, Huss), and the Division of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, School of Medicine (Wagner-Mann), University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.

Search for other papers by Brent D. Jones in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
,
Brian T. Huss From the Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine (Michels, Jones, Huss), and the Division of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, School of Medicine (Wagner-Mann), University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.

Search for other papers by Brian T. Huss in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MS
, and
Colette Wagner-Mann From the Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine (Michels, Jones, Huss), and the Division of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, School of Medicine (Wagner-Mann), University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.

Search for other papers by Colette Wagner-Mann in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD

Click on author name to view affiliation information

Summary

Medical records of 3 cats and 72 dogs that had a fishhook endoscopically or surgically retrieved from the stomach or esophagus were reviewed. Endoscopic retrieval was successful in 41 of 62 (66%) animals, and retrieval time and hospitalization time for endoscopic retrieval were significantly shorter than times for surgical retrieval. Rate of failure of endoscopic retrieval was higher for animals with treble-barb, rather than single-barb, fishhooks. Whether a fishhook could be successfully retrieved endoscopically was independent of body weight, amount of time the fishhook had been present, location of the hook, and orientation within the esophagus.

Summary

Medical records of 3 cats and 72 dogs that had a fishhook endoscopically or surgically retrieved from the stomach or esophagus were reviewed. Endoscopic retrieval was successful in 41 of 62 (66%) animals, and retrieval time and hospitalization time for endoscopic retrieval were significantly shorter than times for surgical retrieval. Rate of failure of endoscopic retrieval was higher for animals with treble-barb, rather than single-barb, fishhooks. Whether a fishhook could be successfully retrieved endoscopically was independent of body weight, amount of time the fishhook had been present, location of the hook, and orientation within the esophagus.

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 344 344 72
PDF Downloads 55 55 13
Advertisement