Case-control study of risk factors for development of pleuropneumonia in horses

Scott M. Austin From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University οf Illinois, Urbana. IL 61801.

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 DVM, MS
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Jonathan H. Foreman From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University οf Illinois, Urbana. IL 61801.

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Laura L. Hungerford From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University οf Illinois, Urbana. IL 61801.

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 DVM, MPH, PhD

Summary

Risk factors for development of pleuropneumonia were determined by reviewing medical records of 45 horses with pleuropneumonia and 180 control horses examined between Jan 1, 1980 and Jan 1, 1990. Factors considered included age, breed, sex, occupation, transport farther than 500 miles within the previous week, racing within the previous 48 hours, viral respiratory tract infection or exposure to horses with viral respiratory tract disease within the previous 2 weeks, and vaccination against influenza or rhinopneumonitis within the previous 6 months. Results indicated that Thoroughbreds were at a greater risk of developing pleuropneumonia than were other horses, and Standardbreds were at a reduced risk. Transport farther than 500 miles and viral respiratory tract disease or exposure to horses with respiratory tract disease were determined to be risk factors for the development of pleuropneumonia.

Summary

Risk factors for development of pleuropneumonia were determined by reviewing medical records of 45 horses with pleuropneumonia and 180 control horses examined between Jan 1, 1980 and Jan 1, 1990. Factors considered included age, breed, sex, occupation, transport farther than 500 miles within the previous week, racing within the previous 48 hours, viral respiratory tract infection or exposure to horses with viral respiratory tract disease within the previous 2 weeks, and vaccination against influenza or rhinopneumonitis within the previous 6 months. Results indicated that Thoroughbreds were at a greater risk of developing pleuropneumonia than were other horses, and Standardbreds were at a reduced risk. Transport farther than 500 miles and viral respiratory tract disease or exposure to horses with respiratory tract disease were determined to be risk factors for the development of pleuropneumonia.

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