Intraocular silicone prosthesis implantation in eyes of dogs and a cat with intraocular neoplasia: nine cases (1983-1994)

Susan A. McLaughlin From the Department of Small Animal Surgery and Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849-5523 (McLaughlin, Gilger, Whitley); the Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (Ramsey, Gerding); and Animal Eye Consultants, 13715 S Cicero Ave, Crestwood, IL 60445 (Lindley).

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David T. Ramsey From the Department of Small Animal Surgery and Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849-5523 (McLaughlin, Gilger, Whitley); the Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (Ramsey, Gerding); and Animal Eye Consultants, 13715 S Cicero Ave, Crestwood, IL 60445 (Lindley).

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Denise M. Lindley From the Department of Small Animal Surgery and Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849-5523 (McLaughlin, Gilger, Whitley); the Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (Ramsey, Gerding); and Animal Eye Consultants, 13715 S Cicero Ave, Crestwood, IL 60445 (Lindley).

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Brian C. Gilger From the Department of Small Animal Surgery and Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849-5523 (McLaughlin, Gilger, Whitley); the Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (Ramsey, Gerding); and Animal Eye Consultants, 13715 S Cicero Ave, Crestwood, IL 60445 (Lindley).

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Paul A. Gerding From the Department of Small Animal Surgery and Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849-5523 (McLaughlin, Gilger, Whitley); the Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (Ramsey, Gerding); and Animal Eye Consultants, 13715 S Cicero Ave, Crestwood, IL 60445 (Lindley).

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R. David Whitley From the Department of Small Animal Surgery and Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849-5523 (McLaughlin, Gilger, Whitley); the Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (Ramsey, Gerding); and Animal Eye Consultants, 13715 S Cicero Ave, Crestwood, IL 60445 (Lindley).

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Objective—

To determine the outcome of implantation of an intraocular silicone prosthesis ( isp) in the eyes of dogs and cats with intraocular neoplasia.

Design—

Retrospective case series.

Animals—

Eight dogs and 1 cat with histologically confirmed intraocular neoplasia.

Procedure—

Signalment, clinical signs before and after surgery, results of microscopic examination of eviscerated intraocular tissues, follow-up information, and necropsy findings, if available, were recorded for each animal.

Results—

Five dogs and 1 cat had primary intraocular neoplasms. Two of the dogs developed regrowth of the neoplasm around the isp 6 to 24 months after implantation, and the eyes were enucleated. The cat developed signs compatible with systemic metastasis 4 years after surgery and was euthanatized. Three dogs had multicentric or metastatic neoplasia involving the eye. Two of these dogs were euthanatized because of their systemic disease 1.5 to 7 months after isp implantation. The third dog is alive without evidence of regrowth 3 years after surgery.

Clinical Implications—

Intraocular neoplasia is not an absolute contraindication to isp implantation

Objective—

To determine the outcome of implantation of an intraocular silicone prosthesis ( isp) in the eyes of dogs and cats with intraocular neoplasia.

Design—

Retrospective case series.

Animals—

Eight dogs and 1 cat with histologically confirmed intraocular neoplasia.

Procedure—

Signalment, clinical signs before and after surgery, results of microscopic examination of eviscerated intraocular tissues, follow-up information, and necropsy findings, if available, were recorded for each animal.

Results—

Five dogs and 1 cat had primary intraocular neoplasms. Two of the dogs developed regrowth of the neoplasm around the isp 6 to 24 months after implantation, and the eyes were enucleated. The cat developed signs compatible with systemic metastasis 4 years after surgery and was euthanatized. Three dogs had multicentric or metastatic neoplasia involving the eye. Two of these dogs were euthanatized because of their systemic disease 1.5 to 7 months after isp implantation. The third dog is alive without evidence of regrowth 3 years after surgery.

Clinical Implications—

Intraocular neoplasia is not an absolute contraindication to isp implantation

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