Ultrasonography of the brain and vertebral canal in dogs and cats: 15 cases (1988-1993)

Jack G. Gallagher From the Departments of Surgery (Gallagher, Penninck, Boudrieau, Berg) and Pathology (Schelling), School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, 200 Westboro Rd, North Grafton, MA 01536.

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Dominique Penninck From the Departments of Surgery (Gallagher, Penninck, Boudrieau, Berg) and Pathology (Schelling), School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, 200 Westboro Rd, North Grafton, MA 01536.

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Randy J. Boudrieau From the Departments of Surgery (Gallagher, Penninck, Boudrieau, Berg) and Pathology (Schelling), School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, 200 Westboro Rd, North Grafton, MA 01536.

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Scott H. Schelling From the Departments of Surgery (Gallagher, Penninck, Boudrieau, Berg) and Pathology (Schelling), School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, 200 Westboro Rd, North Grafton, MA 01536.

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John Berg From the Departments of Surgery (Gallagher, Penninck, Boudrieau, Berg) and Pathology (Schelling), School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, 200 Westboro Rd, North Grafton, MA 01536.

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Summary

Medical records of 3 cats and 12 dogs with lesions of the brain (3 cats, 2 dogs) or vertebral canal (10 dogs) that underwent intraoperative ultrasonography were reviewed. Ultrasonography was performed after craniotomy, a ventral slot procedure, or laminectomy, using a real-time sector scanner with a 7.5- or 10-MHz transducer. In the 3 cats and 2 dogs with brain lesions, cerebral masses were hyperechoic, compared with normal brain, and were easily located. In the 2 dogs, ultrasonography was necessary to localize deep-seated cerebral lesions that could not be seen following craniotomy. In 7 dogs that underwent a ventral slot procedure because of prolapse of an intervertebral disk, ultrasonography was successfully used to assess completeness of disk removal. The remaining 3 dogs underwent dorsal laminectomy because intradural enlargement of the spinal cord (1 dog) or an intradural mass (2 dogs) could be seen myelographically. In the 2 dogs with intradural masses, intraoperative ultrasonography helped to delineate the extent of the tumor. In the third dog, spinal cord swelling was seen ultrasonographically; the histologic diagnosis was spinal cord edema.

Summary

Medical records of 3 cats and 12 dogs with lesions of the brain (3 cats, 2 dogs) or vertebral canal (10 dogs) that underwent intraoperative ultrasonography were reviewed. Ultrasonography was performed after craniotomy, a ventral slot procedure, or laminectomy, using a real-time sector scanner with a 7.5- or 10-MHz transducer. In the 3 cats and 2 dogs with brain lesions, cerebral masses were hyperechoic, compared with normal brain, and were easily located. In the 2 dogs, ultrasonography was necessary to localize deep-seated cerebral lesions that could not be seen following craniotomy. In 7 dogs that underwent a ventral slot procedure because of prolapse of an intervertebral disk, ultrasonography was successfully used to assess completeness of disk removal. The remaining 3 dogs underwent dorsal laminectomy because intradural enlargement of the spinal cord (1 dog) or an intradural mass (2 dogs) could be seen myelographically. In the 2 dogs with intradural masses, intraoperative ultrasonography helped to delineate the extent of the tumor. In the third dog, spinal cord swelling was seen ultrasonographically; the histologic diagnosis was spinal cord edema.

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