Evaluation of results of preoperative urodynamic measurements in nine dogs with ectopic ureters

India F. Lane From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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Michael R. Lappin From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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Howard B. Seim III From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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Summary

Cystometrographic studies and urethral pressure profiles were performed to objectively assess the functional status of the urinary bladder and urethra in 9 dogs with congenital ectopic ureters. Functional abnormalities of the urinary bladder or urethra were detected in 8 of 9 (89%) dogs. Cystometrographic evidence of reduced bladder capacity was detected in 4 (44%) dogs, and abnormalities in urethral pressure profiles were consistent with urethral incompetence in 6 (67%) dogs. Dogs with urethral pressure profile abnormalities were treated with phenylpropanolamine hydrochloride, and the urethral pressure profile was reevaluated. Urethral pressure measurements obtained before surgery (3 dogs) and after phenylpropanolamine (6 dogs) were used to predict the likelihood of continence after surgery. Predicted outcomes included continence maintained without medication (3 dogs), continence maintained with phenylpropanolamine (2 dogs), and persistent incontinence despite phenylpropanolamine administration (4 dogs). After surgical repair of ectopic ureters, 2 of 9 (22%) dogs were continent without medication, and 2 (22%) maintained continence with phenylpropanolamine treatment. Various degrees of incontinence persisted in 5 of 9 (56%) dogs, 4 of which had urethral incompetence that had been documented as poorly responsive to phenylpropanolamine administration prior to surgery. Predicted outcomes were consistent with actual outcomes in 8 of 9 (89%) dogs, with predictions of incontinence proving accurate in 4 of 4 (100%) dogs and predictions of continence proving accurate in 4 of 5 (80%) dogs. Urodynamic assessment of dogs with ectopic ureters appears to be valuable for identifying concurrent functional abnormalities of the urinary bladder and urethra and for predicting postoperative outcome.

Summary

Cystometrographic studies and urethral pressure profiles were performed to objectively assess the functional status of the urinary bladder and urethra in 9 dogs with congenital ectopic ureters. Functional abnormalities of the urinary bladder or urethra were detected in 8 of 9 (89%) dogs. Cystometrographic evidence of reduced bladder capacity was detected in 4 (44%) dogs, and abnormalities in urethral pressure profiles were consistent with urethral incompetence in 6 (67%) dogs. Dogs with urethral pressure profile abnormalities were treated with phenylpropanolamine hydrochloride, and the urethral pressure profile was reevaluated. Urethral pressure measurements obtained before surgery (3 dogs) and after phenylpropanolamine (6 dogs) were used to predict the likelihood of continence after surgery. Predicted outcomes included continence maintained without medication (3 dogs), continence maintained with phenylpropanolamine (2 dogs), and persistent incontinence despite phenylpropanolamine administration (4 dogs). After surgical repair of ectopic ureters, 2 of 9 (22%) dogs were continent without medication, and 2 (22%) maintained continence with phenylpropanolamine treatment. Various degrees of incontinence persisted in 5 of 9 (56%) dogs, 4 of which had urethral incompetence that had been documented as poorly responsive to phenylpropanolamine administration prior to surgery. Predicted outcomes were consistent with actual outcomes in 8 of 9 (89%) dogs, with predictions of incontinence proving accurate in 4 of 4 (100%) dogs and predictions of continence proving accurate in 4 of 5 (80%) dogs. Urodynamic assessment of dogs with ectopic ureters appears to be valuable for identifying concurrent functional abnormalities of the urinary bladder and urethra and for predicting postoperative outcome.

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