Effect of penicillin or penicillin and dexamethasone in cattle with infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis

Larry J. Allen From the Department of Medicine and Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine (Allen, George), and the Department of Statistics, Statistical Laboratory (Willits), University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

Search for other papers by Larry J. Allen in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MPVM
,
Lisle W. George From the Department of Medicine and Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine (Allen, George), and the Department of Statistics, Statistical Laboratory (Willits), University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

Search for other papers by Lisle W. George in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD
, and
Neil H. Willits From the Department of Medicine and Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine (Allen, George), and the Department of Statistics, Statistical Laboratory (Willits), University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

Search for other papers by Neil H. Willits in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 MS, PhD

Click on author name to view affiliation information

Summary

To evaluate the efficacy of penicillin or penicillin and dexamethasone for treatment of infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis, 6- to 8-month-old beef heifers with clinical signs of infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatment groups: penicillin only, penicillin and dexamethasone, or control. Cattle assigned to the penicillin group (n = 18) were treated with 3 daily subconjunctival injections of procaine penicillin G. Cattle assigned to the penicillin/ dexamethasone group (n = 13) were treated with 3 daily subconjunctival injections of procaine penicillin G and dexamethasone sodium phosphate. Control cattle (n = 14) were not treated. Healing times and frequency of recurrence for corneal ulcers; severity, diameter, and surface area measurements of corneal ulcers; and clinical scores did not differ among the 3 groups. Frequency of Moraxella bovis isolation from specimens of ocular secretions from ulcerated and nonulcerated eyes was similar in all groups. Minimum inhibitory concentration of penicillin G for 95 of the 102 tested M bovis isolates was 0.3 U/ml, and for 7 others was 0.03 U/ml. When first and last specimens from 42 of 45 calves with isolation of M bovis on serial microbial cultures were compared, the susceptibility of each last isolate was similar to that of the corresponding first isolate.

Summary

To evaluate the efficacy of penicillin or penicillin and dexamethasone for treatment of infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis, 6- to 8-month-old beef heifers with clinical signs of infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatment groups: penicillin only, penicillin and dexamethasone, or control. Cattle assigned to the penicillin group (n = 18) were treated with 3 daily subconjunctival injections of procaine penicillin G. Cattle assigned to the penicillin/ dexamethasone group (n = 13) were treated with 3 daily subconjunctival injections of procaine penicillin G and dexamethasone sodium phosphate. Control cattle (n = 14) were not treated. Healing times and frequency of recurrence for corneal ulcers; severity, diameter, and surface area measurements of corneal ulcers; and clinical scores did not differ among the 3 groups. Frequency of Moraxella bovis isolation from specimens of ocular secretions from ulcerated and nonulcerated eyes was similar in all groups. Minimum inhibitory concentration of penicillin G for 95 of the 102 tested M bovis isolates was 0.3 U/ml, and for 7 others was 0.03 U/ml. When first and last specimens from 42 of 45 calves with isolation of M bovis on serial microbial cultures were compared, the susceptibility of each last isolate was similar to that of the corresponding first isolate.

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 241 241 108
PDF Downloads 68 68 10
Advertisement