Treatment of olecranon bursitis in horses: 10 cases (1986-1993)

Clifford M. Honnas From the Texas Veterinary Medical Center, Departments of Large Animal Medicine and Surgery (Honnas, Schumacher, Mc-Clure, Crabill, Carter, Schmitz) and Veterinary Anatomy and Public Health (Hoffman), College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A6M University, College Station, TX 77843-4475.

Search for other papers by Clifford M. Honnas in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
,
James Schumacher From the Texas Veterinary Medical Center, Departments of Large Animal Medicine and Surgery (Honnas, Schumacher, Mc-Clure, Crabill, Carter, Schmitz) and Veterinary Anatomy and Public Health (Hoffman), College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A6M University, College Station, TX 77843-4475.

Search for other papers by James Schumacher in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MS
,
Scott R. McClure From the Texas Veterinary Medical Center, Departments of Large Animal Medicine and Surgery (Honnas, Schumacher, Mc-Clure, Crabill, Carter, Schmitz) and Veterinary Anatomy and Public Health (Hoffman), College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A6M University, College Station, TX 77843-4475.

Search for other papers by Scott R. McClure in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
,
Mark R. Crabill From the Texas Veterinary Medical Center, Departments of Large Animal Medicine and Surgery (Honnas, Schumacher, Mc-Clure, Crabill, Carter, Schmitz) and Veterinary Anatomy and Public Health (Hoffman), College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A6M University, College Station, TX 77843-4475.

Search for other papers by Mark R. Crabill in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
,
G. Kent Carter From the Texas Veterinary Medical Center, Departments of Large Animal Medicine and Surgery (Honnas, Schumacher, Mc-Clure, Crabill, Carter, Schmitz) and Veterinary Anatomy and Public Health (Hoffman), College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A6M University, College Station, TX 77843-4475.

Search for other papers by G. Kent Carter in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MS
,
David G. Schmitz From the Texas Veterinary Medical Center, Departments of Large Animal Medicine and Surgery (Honnas, Schumacher, Mc-Clure, Crabill, Carter, Schmitz) and Veterinary Anatomy and Public Health (Hoffman), College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A6M University, College Station, TX 77843-4475.

Search for other papers by David G. Schmitz in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MS
, and
Anton G. Hoffman From the Texas Veterinary Medical Center, Departments of Large Animal Medicine and Surgery (Honnas, Schumacher, Mc-Clure, Crabill, Carter, Schmitz) and Veterinary Anatomy and Public Health (Hoffman), College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A6M University, College Station, TX 77843-4475.

Search for other papers by Anton G. Hoffman in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD

Click on author name to view affiliation information

Summary

Medical records of 10 horses with olecranon bursitis were reviewed to examine treatments, evaluate a technique for en bloc resection of the bursa in standing horses, and determine outcome of the horses after treatment. Before admission, 6 horses had been treated by needle aspiration of fluid from the mass, followed by injection of corticosteroids. Subsequent treatment for 2 of these 6 horses included open drainage and packing of the cavity with gauze soaked in 7% iodine solution. None resolved after these treatments.

After admission to the hospital, 5 horses were treated medically and 5 were treated by en bloc resection of the bursa. One horse that had received intralesional injection of a radionuclide was lost to follow-up evaluation. One horse treated conservatively by open drainage and packing and 1 treated by injection of a radionuclide had resolution of the olecranon bursitis. Only 1 of these 2 horses had a cosmetic result. The acquired bursae decreased in size in 2 horses (1 treated with a corticosteroid and 1 with orgotein), but were still visible 7 and 46 months after treatment, respectively.

The surgery site of 4 horses that were treated by en bloc resection healed by primary intention, and the owners of these horses were pleased with the cosmetic results. The suture line of 1 horse dehisced 5 days after surgery. Proliferative granulation tissue was removed on 2 occasions, and the site healed by second intention after 2 months. A small knot and some white hair remained at the surgery site.

Summary

Medical records of 10 horses with olecranon bursitis were reviewed to examine treatments, evaluate a technique for en bloc resection of the bursa in standing horses, and determine outcome of the horses after treatment. Before admission, 6 horses had been treated by needle aspiration of fluid from the mass, followed by injection of corticosteroids. Subsequent treatment for 2 of these 6 horses included open drainage and packing of the cavity with gauze soaked in 7% iodine solution. None resolved after these treatments.

After admission to the hospital, 5 horses were treated medically and 5 were treated by en bloc resection of the bursa. One horse that had received intralesional injection of a radionuclide was lost to follow-up evaluation. One horse treated conservatively by open drainage and packing and 1 treated by injection of a radionuclide had resolution of the olecranon bursitis. Only 1 of these 2 horses had a cosmetic result. The acquired bursae decreased in size in 2 horses (1 treated with a corticosteroid and 1 with orgotein), but were still visible 7 and 46 months after treatment, respectively.

The surgery site of 4 horses that were treated by en bloc resection healed by primary intention, and the owners of these horses were pleased with the cosmetic results. The suture line of 1 horse dehisced 5 days after surgery. Proliferative granulation tissue was removed on 2 occasions, and the site healed by second intention after 2 months. A small knot and some white hair remained at the surgery site.

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 258 258 133
PDF Downloads 55 55 15
Advertisement