Infiltrative lipoma in dogs: 16 cases (1981–1992)

Philip J. Bergman From the Comparative Oncology Unit, Departments of Clinical Sciences (Bergman, Withrow, Straw) and Radiological Health Sciences (Powers), College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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Stephen J. Withrow From the Comparative Oncology Unit, Departments of Clinical Sciences (Bergman, Withrow, Straw) and Radiological Health Sciences (Powers), College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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Rodney C. Straw From the Comparative Oncology Unit, Departments of Clinical Sciences (Bergman, Withrow, Straw) and Radiological Health Sciences (Powers), College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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Barbara E. Powers From the Comparative Oncology Unit, Departments of Clinical Sciences (Bergman, Withrow, Straw) and Radiological Health Sciences (Powers), College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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Summary

Medical records of 15 dogs with infiltrative lipoma, 1 of which had 2 lesions, were reviewed. Median age of affected dogs was 6.0 years, and median weight was 30.5 kg. The ratio of females to males was 4:1. Eight of the dogs were Labrador Retrievers. In 8 dogs, the lesions had previously been excised. There was not any apparent site predilection. Excision was the only treatment in all 15 dogs, and follow-up information was available for all dogs. Two dogs, each of which had 1 tumor, were euthanatized immediately after surgery, because the tumor could not be completely excised. Of the remaining 14 tumors, 5 (36%) recurred. Median time to recurrence for these 5 tumors was 239 days (range, 96 to 487 days). By means of Kaplan-Meier analysis, the percentage of dogs disease free 1 year after surgery was calculated to be 67%.

Summary

Medical records of 15 dogs with infiltrative lipoma, 1 of which had 2 lesions, were reviewed. Median age of affected dogs was 6.0 years, and median weight was 30.5 kg. The ratio of females to males was 4:1. Eight of the dogs were Labrador Retrievers. In 8 dogs, the lesions had previously been excised. There was not any apparent site predilection. Excision was the only treatment in all 15 dogs, and follow-up information was available for all dogs. Two dogs, each of which had 1 tumor, were euthanatized immediately after surgery, because the tumor could not be completely excised. Of the remaining 14 tumors, 5 (36%) recurred. Median time to recurrence for these 5 tumors was 239 days (range, 96 to 487 days). By means of Kaplan-Meier analysis, the percentage of dogs disease free 1 year after surgery was calculated to be 67%.

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